neuropeptide Y


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neu·ro·pep·tide Y

[MIM*162640]
a 36-amino acid peptide neurotransmitter found in the brain and autonomic nervous system. It augments the vasoconstrictor effects of noradrenergic neurons.

neu·ro·pep·tide Y

(NPY) (nū'rō-pep'tīd)
A 36-amino acid peptide expressed in most regions of the central nervous system including the cortex, hypothalamus, thalamus, olfactory bulb, amygdala, and hippocampus, as well as the peripheral neurons of the sympathetic nervous system. Responsible for regulating various physiologic functions including feeding behavior, reproductive behavior, circadian rhythms, cardiovascular responses, memory, and stress response.
References in periodicals archive ?
Since neuropeptide Y (NPY) was first extracted from a mammalian brain in 1982 (Tatemoto et al., 1982), many studies have found that the npy mRNA is expressed in the central nervous system, peripheral nervous system and peripheral tissues of mammals and teleosts, with the highest expression in the brain (Chen and Li, 2005; Kehoe and Volkoff, 2007; Malmstrom, 2001; Murashita et al., 2009).
Identification, tissue distribution and evaluation of brain neuropeptide Y gene expression in the Brazilian flounder Paralichthys orbignyanus.
Attenuation of the obesity syndrome of ob/ob mice by the loss of neuropeptide Y. Science 1996;274:1704-7.
Sundler, "Neuropeptide Y co-exists and co-operates with noradrenaline in perivascular nerve fibers," Regulatory Peptides, vol.
Holzer, "Neuropeptide Y: a stressful review," Neuropeptides, vol.
Neuropeptide Y (NPY) assumes several key roles in the brain's complex control circuits.
"We've known for quite some time that neuropeptide Y is an endogenous [naturally occurring] anti-stress agent," said Markus Heilig, clinical director of the National Institute of Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA).
Specifically, the study discovered that physiological detection of hypoxic (low oxygen) stress results in the activation of a hidden neuronal circuit involving the neuromodulators serotonin and the neuropeptide Y receptor.
The gene, called npr-1, resembles human genes for proteins on the surface of brain cells that recognize neuropeptide Y, the most potent eating stimulant yet identified in mammals (SN: 7/27/96, p.
Neuropeptide Y ranks among the most effective eating stimulants ever found.
Her studies in rats indicate that one of these chemicals, called neuropeptide Y, causes carbohydrate erarings, while the other, called galanin, seems to underlie a yen for fat.