neuropathic joint

neu·ro·path·ic joint

destructive joint disease caused by diminished proprioceptive sensation, with gradual destruction of the joint by repeated subliminal injury, commonly associated with tabes dorsalis, diabetic neuropathy, or syringomyelia.

neuropathic joint

Neuropathic arthropathy Rheumatology The mechanical failure of a joint due to impaired sensory input; NA is a destructive and productive arthropathy with a loss of pain and nociceptive sensation that may be due to the cumulative effect of trauma and joint laxity Radiology Joint effusion, fragmentation of the articular surface and eburnation of bony surfaces, eventually complete joint disorganization Etiology DM, syringomyelia, tabes dorsalis; rarely, congenital indifference to pain, amyloidosis, meningomyelocele and other 'exotica'

neu·ro·path·ic joint

(nūr'ō-path'ik joynt)
Joint disease caused by diminished proprioceptive sensation, with gradual destruction of the joint by repeated subliminal injury, commonly associated with tabes dorsalis or diabetic neuropathy.
Synonym(s): Charcot joint, neuropathic arthropathy.

neu·ro·path·ic joint

(nūr'ō-path'ik joynt)
Joint disease caused by diminished proprioceptive sensation, with gradual destruction of the joint by repeated subliminal injury.
Synonym(s): Charcot joint.
References in periodicals archive ?
Molony, "Bilateral total knee arthroplasty in neuropathic joint disease," Journal of Orthopaedic Rheumatology, vol.
Neuropathic joint 01 Group II Mild to Moderate Inflammatory Group a.
(6) Because the increased uptake indicates the rate of new bone formation, the technique is less useful in the presence of fractures, in orthopaedic hardware, or in a neuropathic joint. In these conditions, specificity can be improved by adding Ga-67 imaging.
Other new information relates to chondroblastoma, osteoblastoma, and parosteal osteosarcoma, and the section on neoplasm simulators has been expanded to include conditions like neuropathic joint that may present as a neoplasm.
A common clinical question is the differentiation between osteomyelitis and a neuropathic joint. Certain findings (such as the presence of more focal involvement of the bones, skin ulcers, sinus tracts, and abscess) are more suggestive of infection (Figure 14).
The first anatomopathological description of neuropathic joint destruction was reported by Jean-Martin Charcot in 1868.
According to Nick hatzis ET al (7) often a neuropathic joint is misdiagnosed commonly especially that occurring at non weight bearing joints.
Although neuropathic joint disease has been associated with many other conditions such as tabes dorsalis, chronic alcoholism, leprosy, syringomyelia and spinal cord lesions, it is currently most prevalent in patients with diabetes.
The vast majority of basic science research to date has attempted to understand the underlying pathophysiology of diabetic neuropathic joints. Nonetheless, available evidence supports two prevailing theories: the neurotraumatic and neurovascular theories.
Patients with congenital insensitivity to pain may have various orthopedic complications such as recurrent fractures, osteomyelitis and neuropathic joints. The most frequently affected body parts are lower extremities.
Sometimes a total-contact cast is applied for neuropathic joints in the foot.