neuromuscular

(redirected from neuromuscular paralysis)
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neuromuscular

 [noor″o-mus´ku-ler]
pertaining to the nerves and muscles.

neu·ro·mus·cu·lar

(nū'rō-mŭs'kyū-lăr),
Referring to the relationship between nerve and muscle, in particular to the motor innervation of skeletal muscles and its pathology (for example, neuromuscular disorders).
See also: myoneural.

neuromuscular

(no͝or′ō-mŭs′kyə-lər, nyo͝or′-)
adj.
1. Of, relating to, or affecting both nerves and muscles.
2. Having the characteristics of both nervous and muscular tissue.

paraneoplastic syndrome

Oncology A co-morbid condition due to the indirect–remote or 'biologic' effects of malignancy, which may be the first sign of a neoplasm or its recurrence; PSs occur in > 15% of CAs, are caused by hormones, growth factors, biological response modifiers, and other as-yet unidentified factors, and may regress with treatment of the primary tumor. See Ectopic hormone.
Paraneoplastic syndromes
GI tract, eg anorexia, vomiting, protein-losing enteropathy, liver disease
Hematologic, eg leukemoid reaction, reactive eosinophilia, peripheral 'cytoses or 'cytopenias, hemolysis, DIC, thromboembolism, thrombophlebitis migrans
Hormonal effects
Metabolic disease, eg lactic acidosis, hypertrophic pulmonary osteoarthropathy, hyperamylasemia, hyperlipidemia
Neuromuscular, eg peripheral neuropathy, myopathy, CNS, spinal cord degeneration, inflammation
Renal, eg nephrotic syndrome, uric acid nephropathy
Skin, eg bullous mucocutaneous lesions, acquired ichthyosis, acanthosis nigricans, dermatomyositis
Others, eg callus formation, hypertension, and amyloidosis

neu·ro·mus·cu·lar

(nūr'ō-mŭs'kyū-lăr)
Referring to the relationship between nerves and muscles, in particular to the motor innervation of skeletal muscles and its pathology (e.g., neuromuscular disorders).
See also: myoneural

Neuromuscular

Relating to nerve and muscle or their interaction.

neu·ro·mus·cu·lar

(nūr'ō-mŭs'kyū-lăr)
Referring to relationship between nerve and muscle.
References in periodicals archive ?
Botulism causes a descending neuromuscular paralysis with a preserved sensorium and ophthalmoplegia; and poliomyelitis has been nearly eradicated by vaccination worldwide.
The clinical differential diagnosis of tick paralysis versus neuromuscular paralysis with preserved sensorium (adapted from Felz MW, et al).
% Fasciculation 2 11.8 6 14.6 Neuromuscular 3 17.6 7 17.1 Paralysis Fasciculation and neuromuscular paralysis was not present in any patients who were admitted with complaint of taking less than 5 grams of poison while in 28.6% of those patients who had taken poison more than 5 grams fasciculation and neuromuscular paralysis symptoms were present.
In nicotinic symptoms of organophosphate poisoning, we found neuromuscular paralysis was present in 4.7% patient admitted with the complaint of poisoning within 12 hours, fasciculations were not present in any case, and patients who were admitted to our side with complaint of poisoning more than 12 hours, neuromuscular paralysis was present in 20%, fasciculations were present in 15% indicating that incidence of nicotinic symptoms were more in those patients who were admitted with complaint of poisoning more than 12 hours, and these are the late features of organophosphate poisoning.
We found that the nicotinic symptoms like fasciculation and neuromuscular paralysis were not present in any patient admitted with complaint of poisoning of less than 5 grams and were present in 28.6% of patients admitted with complaint of poisoning of more than 5 grams.
(14) Antivenom therapy and respiratory support is the mainstay for treating neuromuscular paralysis. In addition, neostigmine has been successfully used to overcome neuromuscular blockade after Asiatic cobra bites.
One patient out of the total of 10 patients (18.5%) had signs or neuromuscular paralysis alone with a normal clotting time as against the other patients who had both neurological and hematologic involvement There was no cardiac involvement in any of the patients.

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