neuromarketing


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neuromarketing

A recently coined term for the marketing of products and services based on objective neurologic data gleaned from imaging studies—e.g., functional magnetic resonance imaging, EEG, steady state topography, etc.—which assess specific regional changes in brain activity in response to marketing stimuli. Neuromarketing measures psychological, sensorimotor, cognitive, and affective responses, as well as physiologic changes (e.g., heart rate, respiratory rate, galvanic skin response), to study consumer decision making.
References in periodicals archive ?
Neuromarketing studies show the effects of subliminal or brief exposure to cues such as images or words on the eventual results when you are later asked to take action based on those images or words.
It begins by briefly explaining how the brain works and how the subconscious influences the consumer's behavior, then offers advice on selling the neuromarketing plan to the brains of managers.
The Neuromarketing World Forum is organized by the Neuromarketing Science & Business Association (NMSBA), the global trade association for everyone with a professional interest in the field of neuromarketing.
There is an entire industry dedicated to understanding the science of selling through neuromarketing as illustrated by a book aptly named Brainfluence.
Neuromarketing is the use of scientific brain research to potentiate the effectiveness of product marketing.
Innerscope Research is one of a growing number of neuromarketing companies formed in the past decade to measure these non-conscious processes.
CAFE SCIENTIFIQUE [British Council and Forum Democrit present Cafe Scientifique on neuromarketing.
Neuromarketing, as this field is known, has been employed by drug firms, Hollywood studios and even the Campbell Soup Company to sell their wares, despite little published proof of its effectiveness.
Among these are the new domains of neuromarketing, brain fingerprinting, and even "brainotyping," with its potential for assessing racial attitudes and mental health vulnerabilities.
Though this raises the specter of marketers being able to read people's minds, neuromarketing may prove to be an affordable way to gather material that previously was unobtainable or that consumers themselves may not even be aware of fully.
An increasingly varied array of disciplines, from neuromarketing to Hollywood filmmaking and political advertising, has developed penetrating insight regarding the way consumers interact with, and are persuaded by, images.
Neuromarketing, in essence, seeks to answer marketing related questions through the use of neuroscientific knowledge and tools such as fMRI, EEG, etc (Hubert & Kenning, 2008).