inhibition

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inhibition

 [in″hĭ-bish´un]
1. arrest or restraint of a process.
2. in psychoanalysis, the conscious or unconscious restraining of an impulse or desire. adj., adj inhib´itory.
competitive inhibition inhibition of enzyme activity by an inhibitor (a substrate analogue) that competes with the substrate for binding sites on the enzymes.
contact inhibition inhibition of cell division and cell motility in normal animal cells when in close contact with each other.
noncompetitive inhibition inhibition of enzyme activity by substances that combine with the enzyme at a site other than that utilized by the substrate.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

in·hi·bi·tion

(in'hi-bi'shŭn),
1. Depression or arrest of a function.
See also: inhibitor.
2. In psychoanalysis, the restraining of instinctive or unconscious drives or tendencies, especially if they conflict with one's conscience or with societal demands.
3. In psychology, a generic term for a variety of processes associated with the gradual attenuation, masking, and extinction of a previously conditioned response.
4. The reduction of the rate of a reaction or process.
[L. inhibeo, pp. -hibitus, to keep back, fr. habeo, to have]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

inhibition

(ĭn′hə-bĭsh′ən, ĭn′ə-)
n.
1. The act of inhibiting or the state of being inhibited.
2. Something that restrains, blocks, or suppresses.
3. Psychology Conscious or unconscious restraint of a behavioral process, desire, or impulse.
4.
a. Chemistry The condition in which or the process by which a reaction is inhibited.
b. Biology The condition in which or the process by which an enzyme, for example, is inhibited.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

inhibition

Psychiatry Behavior that reflects an unconscious defense against forbidden instinctive drives, which may interfere with or restrict specific activities. See Competitive inhibition, Disinhibition, Enzyme inhibition, Feedback inhibition, Multidrug-resistance inhibition, Outlaw inhibition, Postsynaptic inhibition, Presymptomatic inhibition, Reciprocal inhibition.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

in·hi·bi·tion

(in'hi-bish'ŭn)
1. Depression or arrest of a function.
See also: inhibitor
2. psychoanalysis The restraining of instinctual or unconscious drives or tendencies, especially if they conflict with one's conscience or with societal demands.
3. psychology The gradual attenuation, masking, and extinction of a previously conditioned response.
[L. inhibeo, pp. -hibitus, to keep back, fr. habeo, to have]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

inhibition

Arrest or limitation of a function or activity.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

inhibition

a state in which an enzyme is unable to catalyse reactions. See COMPETITIVE INHIBITION and NONCOMPETITIVE INHIBITION.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005

Inhibition

Referring to the moment in an Alexander lesson when the student refrains from beginning a movement in order to avoid tensing of the muscles.
Gale Encyclopedia of Medicine. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

in·hi·bi·tion

(in'hi-bish'ŭn)
1. Depression or arrest of a function.
See also: inhibitor
2. Reduction of rate of reaction or process.
[L. inhibeo, pp. -hibitus, to keep back, fr. habeo, to have]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
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