neurolaw


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neurolaw

(noor′ō-law, nūr′) [″ + ″]
That branch of the system of justice that treats problems resulting from injuries or illnesses of the central or peripheral nervous system.
References in periodicals archive ?
Morse, Avoiding Irrational Neurolaw Exuberance: A Plea for Neuromodesty, 62 MERCER L.
Although concerns have been expressed about what Tallis (2011) has termed "neuromania"--the view that the complexity of human consciousness can be reduced to neural activity--neuroscience research methods are nevertheless being applied to an array of new fields, such as neuroaesthetics, neurotheology, neurolaw, neuroeconomics, and neuroeducation, to name a few.
Garcia-Lopez presents the book Forensic Psychopathology, Law, Neuroscience and Criminal Justice System, where he introduces the Neurolaw concept in an innovative way in the context of Latin American publications, being one of the first texts on the subject written in Spanish.
(49) Stephan Schleim, Brains in Context in the Neurolaw Debate: The Examples of Free Will and "Dangerous" Brains, 35 INT'L J.L.
LAW firm Hugh James has appointed Ciaran McCabe as a partner to work in its neurolaw team.
programs; (25) and multiple websites make neurolaw news available to the
Shen, The Law and Neuroscience Bibliography: Navigating the Emerging Field of Neurolaw, 38 Int'l J.
Molecular neuroeconomics of crime and punishment: Implications for neurolaw. Neuro Endocrinology Letters, 33(7), 667-673.
neuromarketing to neurolaw, and often without sufficient critical
Neurolaw (265 pages) is published by Clark Boardman Callahan and sells for $145 ATLA member/$165 non-ATLA member.
(122) Peter McKnight, 'Neurolaw' Changes the Landscape of Criminal Responsibility--Or Does It?, VANCOUVER SUN (Dec.