neurohormone

(redirected from neurohormones)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.
Related to neurohormones: Neurotransmitters, hypothalamus, Neuromodulators

neurohormone

 [noor´o-hor″mōn]
a hormone that stimulates neural mechanisms or is released when activated by neural stimuli.

neu·ro·hor·mone

(nū'rō-hōr'mōn),
A hormone formed by neurosecretory cells and liberated by nerve impulses (for example, norepinephrine).

neurohormone

(no͝or′ō-hôr′mōn, nyo͝or′-)
n.
A hormone secreted by or acting on a part of the nervous system.

neu′ro·hor·mo′nal adj.

neu·ro·hor·mone

(nūr'ō-hōr'mōn)
A hormone formed by neurosecretory cells and liberated by nerve impulses (e.g., norepinephrine).
References in periodicals archive ?
The role of the cardioregulatory nerves in mediating heart-rate responses to locomotion, reduced stroke volume, and neurohormones in Homarus americanus.
These vesicles are thought to serve multiple purposes, from the accumulation of proteins and lipids to storage of neurohormones and neurotransmitters, and they are known to appear in various invertebrates (Golding & Pow 1988, Siniscalchi et al.
N-terminal proB-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) is a type of neurohormone synthesized and released mainly from the ventricular myocardium.
Exercise-related changes in these neurohormones were also related to cardiorespiratory fitness.
When cardiac contractile dysfunction is established, the body responds by increasing release of sympathetic neurotransmitters, adrenaline and noradrenaline, and neurohormones, including angiotensin II (ATII), endothelin, and natriuretic peptides.
Pert's (1997) discovery of neurohormones, which link human physiology and emotions, led to the construct that hormones are biochemical molecules of emotion; thoughts and emotions are diffused throughout the body and the mind, and can cause physiological changes.
Neurohormones, released by neurosecretory cells, also have an effect on many brain regions via the circulatory system.
However, there are other neurohormones that also affect cardiac output, either by direct action on the heart or by altering vascular resistance or extracellular fluid volume.
This classification is now universally accepted: inflammation, neurohormones, myocyte Injury, Oxidative Stress, and extracellular matrix remodelling biomarkers (Table 1).
When we are exposed to stress, large quantities of neurohormones are released into the blood stream and in a pregnant woman this can change the developing foetus' own stress response system," Professor Dieter Wolke, Professor of Developmental Psychology at University of Warwick and Warwick Medical School, who led the study, said.
"Some of the reasons that scientists are finding out why acupuncture works are because of the release of certain neurohormones, neurotransmitters and endorphins, which are natural pain killers.