neurohormone


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neurohormone

 [noor´o-hor″mōn]
a hormone that stimulates neural mechanisms or is released when activated by neural stimuli.

neu·ro·hor·mone

(nū'rō-hōr'mōn),
A hormone formed by neurosecretory cells and liberated by nerve impulses (for example, norepinephrine).

neurohormone

/neu·ro·hor·mone/ (noor´o-hor″mōn) a hormone secreted by a specialized neuron into the bloodstream, the cerebrospinal fluid, or the intercellular spaces of the nervous system.

neurohormone

(no͝or′ō-hôr′mōn, nyo͝or′-)
n.
A hormone secreted by or acting on a part of the nervous system.

neu′ro·hor·mo′nal adj.

neurohormone

[noo͡r′əhôr′mōn]
a hormone produced in neurosecretory cells such as those of the hypothalamus and released into the bloodstream, the cerebrospinal fluid, or intercellular spaces of the nervous system. The product may or may not be a true systemic hormone such as epinephrine. When the hormone is not a true hormone, it may be a cell product that induces the release of a tropic hormone, which in turn stimulates an endocrine gland to release a systemic hormone. See also neuromodulator, neurotransmitter.

neu·ro·hor·mone

(nūr'ō-hōr'mōn)
A hormone formed by neurosecretory cells and liberated by nerve impulses (e.g., norepinephrine).

neurohormone

a hormone that is formed in neuron cell bodies and passes down their axons to be stored in the axon terminals until secreted into the blood stream in response to action potentials generated in these neurons (compare neurotransmitters). Examples are the hormones which are formed in nerve cells in the hypothalamus, pass down their axons to their terminals in the posterior pituitary, and are secreted there into the blood when appropriate stimuli activate the hypothalamic cells.

neurohormone

a hormone stimulating the neural mechanism.
References in periodicals archive ?
Each neurohormone that is released will have an impact on both the woman's body and the way she feels; the alternative may also be true that the woman's feelings may inhibit or support the release of the neurohormone.
Since motor neurons in the adult crustacean STNS do not appear to contain these substances as cotransmitters, the assumption has been that neuromodulation of the musculature is due to the actions of neurohormones that circulate in the hemolymph (Jorge-Rivera et al.
Moreover, serotonin could act either as neurotransmitters or neurohormone, and its effect on GSH can be antagonized by other neurotransmitter, dopamine (Fingerman 1997).
B-type natriuretic peptide is a counter-regulatory neurohormone that plays an active role in natriuresis, diuresis, and the inhibition of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (Kruger, Hoffmann, Graf, Janssens, & Hanrath, 2003).
Estrogen is "the queen," while oxytocin, the neurohormone associated with attachment and parenting, is a "fluffy, purring kitty.
Natriuretics are a class of neurohormone that allows the heart to take part in vascular fluid balance by increasing sodium (natrium) excretion to control the amount of fluid loss (uresis) from the body.
Melatonin is a neurohormone controlled by the suprachiasmatic nucleus produced by the pineal gland.
A neurohormone, BNP is secreted in conditions that cause volume or pressure overload of the ventricles.
The apparent target of both exercise and antidepressant pharmacotherapy treatment modalities is neurohormone activity, mainly that of central nervous system serotonin.
Tracleer blocks receptor binding of endothelin, a potent blood vessel constrictor; elevated levels of the neurohormone in PAH suggest that it plays a pathogenic role.
1,2) Navach documented that a single neurohormone cluster in the mammalian body may be induced to resonate by an outside electromagnetic source.
At the physiological level, it is of interest that the neurohormone that accelerates metamorphosis (corticotropin-releasing hormone and its related peptides; interestingly, this is the primary vertebrate stress neurohormone; Denver and Licht 1989, Gancedo et al.