neurohormone

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neurohormone

 [noor´o-hor″mōn]
a hormone that stimulates neural mechanisms or is released when activated by neural stimuli.

neu·ro·hor·mone

(nū'rō-hōr'mōn),
A hormone formed by neurosecretory cells and liberated by nerve impulses (for example, norepinephrine).

neurohormone

/neu·ro·hor·mone/ (noor´o-hor″mōn) a hormone secreted by a specialized neuron into the bloodstream, the cerebrospinal fluid, or the intercellular spaces of the nervous system.

neurohormone

(no͝or′ō-hôr′mōn, nyo͝or′-)
n.
A hormone secreted by or acting on a part of the nervous system.

neu′ro·hor·mo′nal adj.

neurohormone

[noo͡r′əhôr′mōn]
a hormone produced in neurosecretory cells such as those of the hypothalamus and released into the bloodstream, the cerebrospinal fluid, or intercellular spaces of the nervous system. The product may or may not be a true systemic hormone such as epinephrine. When the hormone is not a true hormone, it may be a cell product that induces the release of a tropic hormone, which in turn stimulates an endocrine gland to release a systemic hormone. See also neuromodulator, neurotransmitter.

neu·ro·hor·mone

(nūr'ō-hōr'mōn)
A hormone formed by neurosecretory cells and liberated by nerve impulses (e.g., norepinephrine).

neurohormone

a hormone that is formed in neuron cell bodies and passes down their axons to be stored in the axon terminals until secreted into the blood stream in response to action potentials generated in these neurons (compare neurotransmitters). Examples are the hormones which are formed in nerve cells in the hypothalamus, pass down their axons to their terminals in the posterior pituitary, and are secreted there into the blood when appropriate stimuli activate the hypothalamic cells.

neurohormone

a hormone stimulating the neural mechanism.
References in periodicals archive ?
Medical therapy consists of two components: (i) disease-modifying drugs consisting of three neurohormonal antagonists (angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors (or angiotensin receptor blockers), beta-blockers, and mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists) that are fundamental in modifying the course of disease and improving survival; and (ii) symptomatic therapies, such as diuretics and digoxin, that relieve congestion, reduce hospitalisation and improve quality of life.
Neurohormonal circuits development begins at conception and will continue up until the age of 20-30 years.
Neurohormonal theory on the development of a homosexual orientation has two directions: inversion theory and continuum theory.
The neurohormonal theory incorporates five key predictions, one of which is that homosexuality should evidence a significant degree of heritability.
Por lo tanto se evidencia la necesidad de empezar a disenar programas de medicina preventiva para reducir el riesgo de morbilidad y mortalidad de esta enfermedad debida a la remodelacion ventricular como consecuencia de la activacion neurohormonal temprana.
The increased central volume produces neurohormonal adaptations such as decreases in plasma vasopressin, renin and aldosterone and an increase in natriuretic atrial factor release (1,12,21).
Effects of chronic angiotensin II receptor antagonist and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor treatments on neurohormonal levels and haemodynamics during cardiopulmonary bypass.
It probably also affects the hypothalamus causing changes in the hypothalamic neurohormonal regulatory mechanisms and the reticular formation of the brain stem.
Further, will uncovering the nature of the neurohormonal defects among those with PTSD lead to the development of advanced treatments?