neurofibroma

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neurofibroma

 [noor″o-fi-bro´mah]
a tumor of peripheral nerves due to abnormal proliferation of Schwann cells; called also fibroneuroma.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

neu·ro·fi·bro·ma

(nū'rō-fī-brō'mă),
A moderately firm, benign, encapsulated tumor resulting from proliferation of Schwann cells in a disorderly pattern that includes portions of nerve fibers; in neurofibromatosis, neurofibromas are multiple.
Synonym(s): fibroneuroma
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

neurofibroma

(no͝or′ō-fī-brō′mə, nyo͝or′-)
n. pl. neurofibro·mas or neurofibro·mata (-mə-tə)
A benign tumor of the peripheral nerve sheath, usually nonencapsulated and composed of a mixture of cell types including Schwann cells and fibroblasts.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

neu·ro·fi·bro·ma

(nūr'ō-fī-brō'mă)
A benign, encapsulated tumor resulting from proliferation of Schwann cells.
Synonym(s): fibroneuroma.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

Neurofibroma

A soft tumor usually located on a nerve.
Mentioned in: Neurofibromatosis
Gale Encyclopedia of Medicine. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

neu·ro·fi·bro·ma

(nūr'ō-fī-brō'mă)
A moderately firm, benign, encapsulated tumor resulting from proliferation of Schwann cells in a disorderly pattern that includes portions of nerve fibers.
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Pigmented neurofibroma: review of Japanese patients with an analysis of melanogenesis demonstrating coexpression of c-met protooncogene and microphthalmia-associated transcription factor.
Diagnostic criteria for neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1).At least two of seven well-established criteria must be present --[greater than or equal to] 6 cafe-au-lait macules of > 5 mm in size in pre-pubertal patients, and > 15 mm in size in post-pubertal patients --[greater than or equal to] 2 or more dermal neurofibromas or one plexiform neurofibroma --freckling in the axillary or inguinal regions (Crowe sign) --optic glioma --[greater than or equal to] 2 or more Lisch nodules (iris hamartomas) --orthopaedic abnormalities; and/or --a first-degree relative with NF1 based on the above criteria.
(i) Confocal laser scanning microscopy might be able to differentiate the morphological features of Schwann cells in neurofibromas. Absence of fluorescence in Schwann cells was found in neurofibromas which later recur or undergo malignant degeneration.
Abdominal involvement in NF-1 occurs in the form of sporadic neurofibromas versus PNFs which can involve the liver [17, 24], mesentery [25, 27, 28], retroperitoneum [29], and gastrointestinal (GI) tract [30].
There are some evidences that schwannomas have a greater extent of S100 with a diffuse pattern expression in comparison with neurofibromas. It is obvious that relying on expression profile of these markers is not sufficient for distinction of these two subtypes of neurogenic tumors.
Clinicians should be aware of the association of MPNSTs and diffuse neurofibromas with NF1, a diagnosis, if confirmed, with great clinical and genetic implications for the patient and his/her family.
(1) Six or more pigmentations greater than 5 mm before puberty and greater than 15 mm after puberty (cafe au lait) (2) One plexiform neurofibroma or more than two neurofibromas of any type (3) Axillary or inguinal freckling (4) Optic glioma (5) Two or more "Lisch" nodules (iris hamartoma) (6) Bone lesions (7) Presence of at least one of these clinical findings in first-degree relatives
Neurofibromas are rare, benign, peripheral nerve sheath tumours which can be a manifestation of neurofibromatosis type 1 (NFI).
[5] Also plexiform neurofibromas are highly vascular with abnormal friable blood vessels, carrying a significant risk for bleeding during surgery.
(3) NF1 is characterized by multiple cafe-au-lait macules, axillary freckling, neurofibromas, and Lisch nodules (pigmented iris hamartomas).
Neurofibromas, optic gliomas, hamartomas are benign lesions.