neuroethics


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neuroethics

(no͝or′ō-ĕth′ĭks, nyo͝or′-)
n. (used with a sing. verb)
The branch of bioethics that deals with the ethical implications of prescribing psychotropic drugs, such as antidepressants or amphetamines, that alter thought, mood, or behavior, and of techniques that image the brain to reveal information about motive or intent.

neu′ro·eth′i·cal adj.
neu′ro·eth′i·cist (-ĭ-sĭst) n.

neuroethics

The ethical discipline that has arisen as a result of the extraordinary advances of recent years in the neurosciences, their clinical applications and their social and philosophical implications.
References in periodicals archive ?
She is past president of the International Neuroethics Society and author of Developments in Neuroethics and Bioethics.
It is a landmark volume for the state-of-the-art and exploration of pain neuroethics, said Dr.
The Popular New Genre of Neurosexism", Neuroethics, vol.
Neuroethics and responsibility in conducting neuromarketing research.
Correspondence: Eric Racine, PhD, Director, Neuroethics Research Unit, Institut de recherches cliniques de Montreal (IRCM), 110 avenue des Pins Ouest, Montreal, QC H2W IR7, Tel: 514-987-5723, E-mail: eric.racine@ircm.qc.ca
Bortolotti, L., "In Defence of Modest Doxasticism About Delusions", en: Neuroethics, v.
NeuroDevNet is a federally funded Network of Centres of Excellence (NCE), comprised of 19 research projects and three service 'Cores'--NeuroInformatics, NeuroEthics, and Knowledge Translation (KT) all working to ensure that children with neurodevelopmental disorders (ASD, CP, FASD): 1) get diagnosed sooner; 2) receive validated interventions; and, 3) are provided with family services to maximize their potential.
Levy (Eds.), Handbook of neuroethics. Paises Bajos: Springer.
y Grabner, R., Neuroeducation: A critical overview of an emerging field, Neuroethics, 5(2), 105-117 (2012)
See also Catherine Vidal, The Sexed Brain: Between Science and Ideology, 5 NEUROETHICS 295 (2012) (offering "evidence against archaic beliefs about the biological determinism of sex differences").
emerging fields of neurolaw and neuroethics. (4) Law and neuroscience as
Neuroethics. New York: Cambridge University Press, 2007, p.