neuroethics


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neuroethics

(no͝or′ō-ĕth′ĭks, nyo͝or′-)
n. (used with a sing. verb)
The branch of bioethics that deals with the ethical implications of prescribing psychotropic drugs, such as antidepressants or amphetamines, that alter thought, mood, or behavior, and of techniques that image the brain to reveal information about motive or intent.

neu′ro·eth′i·cal adj.
neu′ro·eth′i·cist (-ĭ-sĭst) n.

neuroethics

The ethical discipline that has arisen as a result of the extraordinary advances of recent years in the neurosciences, their clinical applications and their social and philosophical implications.
References in periodicals archive ?
See generally THE OXFORD HANDBOOK OF NEUROETHICS (Judy Illes
Tovino, The Impact of Neuroscience on Health Laxo, 1 Neuroethics 101, 103 (2008) (noting that "[m]ental disorders remain poorly understood today," and recounting estimates by Mental Health America that the majority of Americans attribute mental disorders to "mental weakness," "poor parenting," and "a form of retribution for sinful or immoral behavior").
Neuroethics, neuroeducation, and classroom teaching: Where the brain sciences meet pedagogy.
Essays explore neural mechanisms, cybernetics, controls, and frameworks; electroencephalography; brain-computer interfaces; systems modeling language and dynamics; and neuroethics as well as other topics.
For a critique of the claims of neuroethics about free will, see Tom Buller, "Rationality, Responsibility, and Brain Function," Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 19 (2010) 196-204.
Neuroscience and the Problem of Other Animal Minds: Why It May Not Matter So Much for Neuroethics, ANDREW FENTON
Part III addresses the field of neuroethics, arguing that
Morse, Psychopathy and Criminal Responsibility, 1 NEUROETHICS 205, 209 (2008).
Neuroethics, neurochallenges a needs based research agenda [internet].
Why is neuroethics interested in such a possibility?
Responsibility, 1 NEUROETHICS 205 (2008) (providing a fuller account).
Neuroethics is a field that studies the implications of modern neuroscience for human self-understanding, ethics, and policy.