neuroendoscope

neuroendoscope

 [noor″o-en´do-skōp″]
an endoscope for examining and performing various interventions in the central nervous system.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
The neuroendoscope was placed into the lateral ventricle and the third ventricle to evaluate the severity of CVI; to obliterate the intraventricular debris, pus, and clots; to fenestrate or incise the intraventricular compartments; and to reconstruct CSF circulation.
Stereotactic aspiration of an intracranial hematoma with a neuroendoscope is a feasible and effective method to prevent further brain damage.
After insertion of the neuroendoscope working channel and identification of the intraventricular lesion, cautery of the tumor or cyst capsule was performed through the working channel.
Instead, a minimally invasive technique which involves the use of a neuroendoscope to remove the blood clot under local anaesthesia was used.
The development and improvement of a neuroendoscope provides favorable conditions to the keyhole microsurgery, which can improve the poor field of vision during operation.[sup][3],[4],[5],[6],[7] Neuroendoscope with a diameter of 2–4 mm can provide a bright, detailed image of deep lesions, and the near to the lesion, the better and clearer the image magnification will be.
In some cases, visualization required the use of a 30[degrees] rigid endoscope or flexible neuroendoscope. A larger diameter rigid endoscope with multiple working channels is then introduced, through which tumor manipulation, coagulation, and resection take place.
Variations of "pressure inside the neuroendoscope" correlate to "intracranial pressure" changes during neuroendoscopic procedures.