neuroendocrine


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neuroendocrine

 [noor″o-en´do-krin]
pertaining to neural and endocrine influence, and particularly to the interaction between the nervous and endocrine systems.

neu·ro·en·do·crine

(nū'rō-en'dō-krin),
1. Pertaining to the anatomic and functional relationships between the nervous system and the endocrine apparatus.
2. Descriptive of cells that release a hormone into the circulating blood in response to a neural stimulus. Such cells may compose a peripheral endocrine gland (for example, the insulin-secreting β cells of the islets of Langerhans in the pancreas and the adrenaline-secreting chromaffin cells of the adrenal medulla); others are neurons in the brain (for example, the neurons of the supraoptic nucleus that release antidiuretic hormone from their axon terminals in the posterior lobe of the hypophysis).

neuroendocrine

/neu·ro·en·do·crine/ (-en´do-krin) pertaining to neural and endocrine influence, and particularly to the interaction between the nervous and endocrine systems.

neuroendocrine

(no͝or′ō-ĕn′də-krĭn, -krēn′, -krīn′, nyo͝or′-)
adj.
Of, relating to, or involving the interaction between the nervous system and the hormones of the endocrine glands: the neuroendocrine apparatus in birds.

neuroendocrine

[noo͡r′ō·en′dəkrin]
Etymology: Gk, neuron, nerve, endon, within, krinein, to secrete
pertaining to or resembling the effects produced by endocrine glands strongly linked with the nervous system.

neuroendocrine

adjective Referring to the structural and functional interface between the nervous and endocrine systems, or to hormones produced by neuroendocrine cells.

neu·ro·en·do·crine

(nūr'ō-en'dō-krin)
1. Pertaining to the anatomic and functional relationships between the nervous system and the endocrine apparatus.
2. Descriptive of cells that release a hormone into the circulating blood in response to a neural stimulus.

neuroendocrine

pertaining to neural and endocrine influence, and particularly to the interaction between the nervous and endocrine systems.

neuroendocrine cell
present in skin and oral mucosae of some species; thought to act as pressure receptors.
neuroendocrine cell tumor
rare tumors of neuroendocrine cells in the skin and oral mucosa, where they are pedunculated and located on the lips and gums. In the skin, they occur on the lips, ears or digits, where they may grow rapidly and ulcerate. Called also Merkel cell tumor.
neuroendocrine receptors
receptors located on the membrane of the target cell.
neuroendocrine system
the nervous system plus the endocrine system and the interactions between them.
References in periodicals archive ?
Learning that I have been diagnosed with NeuroEndocrine Tumour as of now has admittedly been difficult, but the love and strength of those around me and that I found within me has brought me to a place of hope.
Keywords: SCNEC: Small cell neuroendocrine carcinoma, Gy: Grey, APUD: Amine precursor uptake and decarboxylase System.
The true incidence and clinical features of NETs of the breast are difficult to define, since neuroendocrine markers are not routinely used in breast cancer diagnosis and studies use varying marker positivity to define neuroendocrine differentiation.
All the usual immunohistochemical stains for solid pseudopapillary tumor showed diverse pattern of expression from positive to focal positive with negativity for neuroendocrine markers.
We report the first presentation of usual PA with neuroendocrine differentiation, with an emphasis on the radiological pattern.
The histologic characteristics of primary small cell neuroendocrine carcinomas are cellular monotony, fine granular (salt and pepper) chromatin, inconspicuous nucleoli, pseudorosettes and palisades and a high mitotic rate.
Neuroendocrine differentiation in prostate cancer: implications for new treatment modalities.
The report provides a snapshot of the global therapeutic landscape of Neuroendocrine Tumors
The most common laryngeal neuroendocrine tumor is the atypical carcinoid (moderately differentiated neuroendocrine carcinoma), which is a malignant epithelial tumor showing neuroendocrine histologic and immunohistochemical features.
Background: The optimal surgical management of nonfunctional pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (NF-PNETs) is still controversial.
They discuss hypothalamic function and pathophysiology, including vasopressin, oxytocin, and corticotropin-releasing hormone and neuroendocrine regulation, stress and water metabolism, and their role as mediators of emotional and social behaviors; new developments in disorders of the pituitary gland, including active and inactive adenomas, Rathke's cleft cysts, craniopharyngioma, and unusual forms of hypopituitarism; and controversial issues like Nelson syndrome, familial pituitary tumors, and autoimmune hypophysitis, as well as central adrenal insufficiency, hypothyroidism, growth hormone deficiency, the irreversible consequences of pituitary tumors and their treatment on quality of life and neuropsychologic function, and neuroendocrine mechanisms in adaptation to exercise.
Neuroendocrine tumours are often difficult to diagnose, their symptoms often vague and non-specific.