neuroendocrine


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neuroendocrine

 [noor″o-en´do-krin]
pertaining to neural and endocrine influence, and particularly to the interaction between the nervous and endocrine systems.

neu·ro·en·do·crine

(nū'rō-en'dō-krin),
1. Pertaining to the anatomic and functional relationships between the nervous system and the endocrine apparatus.
2. Descriptive of cells that release a hormone into the circulating blood in response to a neural stimulus. Such cells may compose a peripheral endocrine gland (for example, the insulin-secreting β cells of the islets of Langerhans in the pancreas and the adrenaline-secreting chromaffin cells of the adrenal medulla); others are neurons in the brain (for example, the neurons of the supraoptic nucleus that release antidiuretic hormone from their axon terminals in the posterior lobe of the hypophysis).

neuroendocrine

(no͝or′ō-ĕn′də-krĭn, -krēn′, -krīn′, nyo͝or′-)
adj.
Of, relating to, or involving the interaction between the nervous system and the hormones of the endocrine glands: the neuroendocrine apparatus in birds.

neuroendocrine

adjective Referring to the structural and functional interface between the nervous and endocrine systems, or to hormones produced by neuroendocrine cells.

neu·ro·en·do·crine

(nūr'ō-en'dō-krin)
1. Pertaining to the anatomic and functional relationships between the nervous system and the endocrine apparatus.
2. Descriptive of cells that release a hormone into the circulating blood in response to a neural stimulus.
References in periodicals archive ?
hormone profiling, WHO 2010 grading, and AJCC/UICC staging in pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor behavior.
Pathologic examination of specimens showed intra-alveolar localized neuroendocrine cell proliferation and minimal interstitial fibrosis under the bronchial epithelium and in the parenchyma [Figure 5].
Treatment of neuroendocrine tumors: new recommendations based on the CLARINET study.
However, everolimus plus octreotide long-acting repeatable has shown significant benefits and improved outcomes for patients with advanced colorectal neuroendocrine tumors (8).
MANEC is a rare entity that has been defined differently since its first definition by Cordier in 1924 and several years later by Lewin in 1987 until the final description given in 2010 by the WHO as neoplasms involving both the epithelial and the neuroendocrine components.
Liver is the most common site of metastasis for neuroendocrine tumors of gastrointestinal tract1.
They contain eosinophilic cytoplasmic inclusions and, unlike true Paneth cells, lack lysozyme, but express neuroendocrine markers and show neurosecretory granules on electron microscopy, which makes them more similar to the cells of the diffuse neuroendocrine system.
Microscopic examination of the specimen showed solid, nesting, glandular masses of monotonous small circular cells with peripheral palisading; moderate amount of finely granular cytoplasm with small nucleoli and salt paper chromatin; and 2-3 mitotic activity per high power field, thus confirming the diagnosis of neuroendocrine tumor (Figure 1).
The approval is for adult patients with somatostatin receptor-positive GEP-NETs and it includes conditions such as foregut, midgut, and hindgut neuroendocrine tumours.
When liver metastases are demonstrated, CT of the chest and abdomen, abdominal ultrasonography, upper gastrointestinal endoscopy, and colonoscopy are performed to exclude primary tumors other than those of the lung, but no other gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors were found in our case.
M2 PRESSWIRE-September 4, 2019-: Neuroendocrine Cancer Market 2019: Global Key Players, Trends, Share, Industry Size, Segmentation, Opportunities, Forecast To 2026