neurocirculatory

neurocirculatory

 [noor″o-ser″ku-lah-tor″e]
pertaining to the nervous and circulatory systems.

neurocirculatory

/neu·ro·cir·cu·la·to·ry/ (-serk´ūl-ah-tor″e) pertaining to the nervous and circulatory systems.

neurocirculatory

(nū″rō-sŭr′kū-lă-tō″rē) [″ + L. circulatio, circulation]
Pert. to circulation and the nervous system.

neurocirculatory

pertaining to the nervous and circulatory systems.
References in periodicals archive ?
Different terms--such as Da Costa syndrome, irritable heart, shell shock, neurocirculatory asthenia, and battle fatigue--have been used to coin the difficult to understand soldier's medical conditions following war situations [2].
Neurocirculatory responses to intubation with either an endotracheal tube or laryngeal mask airway in humans.
Over the years and well into the 20th century, many names--including Da Costa's syndrome as well as combat neurosis, shell shock, soldier's heart, neurocirculatory asthenia, and/or simply anxiety neurosis, as my father called it--have been applied to this syndrome.
Over the years, many names have been assigned to this syndrome, such as combat fatigue, neurocirculatory asthenia, or shell shock.
The generator can be used to prevent hypertension, bronchial asthma, a disease of the respiratory organs (bronchitis, pneumonia), acute rhinitis, influenza, gastrointestinal diseases, hypotension, insomnia, and neurocirculatory dystonia.
We are pleased that Oxycyte will be tested in animals for its potential to treat stroke, at a University renowned for its research on neurocirculatory disorders," said Dr.
Examples of such traumas and complexes are shell shock, soldier's heart, combat neurosis, combat fatigue, or De Costa syndrome, known for more than a century as neurocirculatory asohenia.
Though not well studied or understood, supplemental exercise is thought to mitigate adenosine-related bradycardia and hypotension via a neurocirculatory response, he said.
Before, we referred to the symptoms of PTSD as shell shock, soldier's heart, combat fatigue, or neurocirculatory asthenia, and sometimes as Da Costa syndrome.
High circulating levels of epinephrine could create a neurocirculatory feedback loop that would promote syncope by stimulating [beta]-2 adrenoreceptors.
In the course of our careers, many of us have run across terms like shell shock, soldier's heart, combat neurosis, combat fatigue, or--get this--Da Costa syndrome, known for more than a century as neurocirculatory asthenia, and a favorite term that my father, an ophthalmic surgeon, used for patients he thought had visual difficulties that were secondary to severe emotional stress.