neurochemical


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neurochemical

adjective Referring to neurochemistry.
 
noun A nonspecific term for a biomolecule (e.g., serotonin, dopamine or neural growth factor) that participates in neural activity.
References in periodicals archive ?
M2 PHARMA-July 27, 2018-Bioasis' Lead Candidate Increases Brain Neurochemicals in Pre-clinical Microdialysis Study
The neurochemical, dopamine, is released during a traumatic event (Sherin & Nemeroff, 2011).
Blood Cells Isolation and Determination of Peripheral Neurochemical Markers, That Is, Muscarinic Receptors in Lymphocytes (l-MRs) and Monoamine Oxidase B in Platelets (p-MAO-B).
Such processes of self, in this analysis, include becoming active in response to the dominant neurochemical discourses (Fullagar & O'Brien, 2012; Rose, 2003).
He focused on the synaptic receptors that regulate the content of the neurochemicals serotonin, dopamine, norepinephrine, and GABA.
The mental benefits of aerobic exercise have a neurochemical basis.
Partial contents: "The Influence of Chronic Nicotine Administration on Behavioural and Neurochemical Parameters in Male and Female Rats after Repeated Binge Drinking Exposure," by Frederic Lallemand, Roberta J.
While the pill's legacy was to liberate women, to offer relief from constant worry about pregnancy and to start the sexual revolution, pharma today seems instead to want to constrain women, suggesting that most women are--or should be--constantly worried about getting pleasure from (hetero) sexual activities because of hormonal, neurochemical or other biologic insufficiencies that need drug treatment.
Facilitated by the availability of high-resolution MRS techniques such as high-resolution magic-angle spinning (HR-MAS) MRS, researchers have initiated MRS-based analyses employing rodent FASD models to elucidate developmental stage--and region-dependent neurochemical changes.
Neurochemical aspects of neurotraumatic and neurodegenerative diseases.
-- Chemical dependence as a result of drug abuse occurs at the cellular level because of neurochemical dysregulation, and an evidence-based understanding of these chemical dynamics and of the circumstances that drive a person to abuse drugs could yield a more comprehensive and effective approach to treatment.
In this issue of Clinical Chemistry, Mulder and coworkers, who are experts in the neurochemical diagnosis field, provide data on the performance of these biomarkers in a routine setting over a 7-year period (14).