neurobiology


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neurobiology

 [noor″o-bi-ol´o-je]
biology of the nervous system.

neu·ro·bi·ol·o·gy

(nū'rō-bī-ol'ŏjē),
The biology of the nervous system.

neurobiology

(no͝or′ō-bī-ŏl′ə-jē, nyo͝or′-)
n.
The biological study of the nervous system.

neu′ro·bi′o·log′i·cal (-bī′ə-lŏj′ĭ-kəl) adj.
neu′ro·bi·ol′o·gist n.

neurobiology

The formal study of the physiology and physiopathology of the nervous system.
References in periodicals archive ?
Roger wants to continue his position in education, spearheading the interest in Chemistry and Neurobiology in the younger generation.
Barres joined as an assistant professor in Stanford University's department of neurobiology in 1993.
"This is a really exciting time for me, and for advances in neurobiology and for science in Wales."
The Baylor research, the first of its kind, established a baseline of the acute effects of alcohol in aged populations, which can aid future research into neurobiology and in determining the effect of prolonged alcohol abuse.
* Xiao-Jing Wang; PhD, Department of Neurobiology, Physics and Psychology; Director, Swartz Program in Theoretical Neurobiology; Kavli Institute of Neuroscience, Yale University School of Medicine
Developments in neurobiology are providing new insights into the biological and physical features of human thinking, and brain-activation imaging methods such as functional magnetic resonance imaging have become the most dominant research techniques to approach the biological part of thinking.
Ejaz, a fourth-year neurobiology, physiology and behavior major; was invited to write about the community outreach.
"We've often heard that weight problems are caused by defective genes, and now we're beginning to assemble evidence that shows how important genes in the pituitary gland are to maintaining optimal weight," said Childs, who also is a professor and chair of the Department of Neurobiology & Developmental Sciences in the UAMS College of Medicine.
Among the chapter topics are the relevance of sleep neurobiology for cognitive neuroscience and anesthesiology, the neurobiology of consciousness, memory formation during general anesthesia, monitoring anesthetic depth, and three chapters on the psychological, philosophical, and medicolegal consequences of intraoperative awareness.
Daniel Lord Smail proposes that if history is to reach back before the advent of written records, and if it is to take account of both biological and cultural evolution as well as the burgeoning neurobiology of our time, then its evidential foundations must be reformulated.
Title: Assistant professor of neurobiology, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine