neurobiologist


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neurobiologist

 [noor″o-bi-ol´o-jist]
a specialist in neurobiology.
References in periodicals archive ?
"This is just the tip of the iceberg," said senior author Peihua Jiang, Ph.D., also a Monell molecular neurobiologist. "Identification of these cells opens up a whole new area for studying taste cell renewal, and contributes to stem cell biology in general."
For Georges Chapouthier, a neurobiologist and director of the Emotion Centre at Pierre and Marie Curie University in Paris, self-awareness means that dolphin and whales, along with some higher primates, can experience not just pain but also suffering.
Understanding how animals sense magnetic fields is one of great remaining mysteries of sensory biology, notes Kenneth Lohmann, a neurobiologist at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.
Galen Kaufman, a Texas neurobiologist and Fizzy Fruit's inventor, discovered it while he was on a sailing trip.
Dr Dan McGehee, a neurobiologist at the University of Chicago, said: 'A whole range of psychiatric conditions seem to be helped by nicotine.
* Joe Miller, a University of Southern California neurobiologist, could not read magnetic tapes from NASA's 1976 Viking landings on Mars.
Bower, a former Caltech neurobiologist, "There's nothing more entertaining than education, done properly."
Mombaerts, an immunologist and neurobiologist, has contributed to the basic mechanistic understanding of olfaction by using gene-targeting technology.
The application for the award was drafted by Vice Chancellor Sir Brian Follett, Prof Dalton and neurobiologist Professor Nick Dale.
Laughter, argues Provine, a neurobiologist and psychologist at the University of Maryland, "began as a ritualization of the panting sound of rowdy play" among primates, but human laughter is "elicited by a wider range of stimuli, including conversation." It has since evolved further, becoming a social tool used to show--consciously and unconsciously--interest, subservience, disdain, or any number of other attitudes.
Princeton University neurobiologist Joe Tsien and colleagues report that adding a single gene, NR2B, to mice significantly increased the animals' ability to solve maze problems and to learn and retain information about their environment.
In the Doogie experiment, researchers led by Joseph Tsien, a Princeton University neurobiologist (scientist who studies brain function), altered a specific gene that affects how the brain forms lasting memories (see diagram below).

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