neurobiologist


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neurobiologist

 [noor″o-bi-ol´o-jist]
a specialist in neurobiology.

neurobiologist

a specialist in neurobiology.
References in periodicals archive ?
Understanding how animals sense magnetic fields is one of great remaining mysteries of sensory biology, notes Kenneth Lohmann, a neurobiologist at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.
Mombaerts, an immunologist and neurobiologist, has contributed to the basic mechanistic understanding of olfaction by using gene-targeting technology.
The application for the award was drafted by Vice Chancellor Sir Brian Follett, Prof Dalton and neurobiologist Professor Nick Dale.
Laughter, argues Provine, a neurobiologist and psychologist at the University of Maryland, "began as a ritualization of the panting sound of rowdy play" among primates, but human laughter is "elicited by a wider range of stimuli, including conversation.
Princeton University neurobiologist Joe Tsien and colleagues report that adding a single gene, NR2B, to mice significantly increased the animals' ability to solve maze problems and to learn and retain information about their environment.
In the Doogie experiment, researchers led by Joseph Tsien, a Princeton University neurobiologist (scientist who studies brain function), altered a specific gene that affects how the brain forms lasting memories (see diagram below).
Neurobiologist Rougier has also created a wonder sex drug called Tigra.
This result raises the possibility that the bright artificial lighting typical of hospital nurseries sometimes wreaks havoc with the biological rhythms of human babies, according to neurobiologist Scott A.
A research team led by neurobiologist Margaret Livingstone trained three rhesus macaques to identify symbols representing the numbers zero to 25.
Neurobiologist Igor Siwanowicz of the Janelia Farm Research Campus in Ashburn, Va.
Neurobiologist Professor Alun Davies, of the School of Biosciences, and Professor John Parkes, head of the School of Earth and Ocean Sciences, were elected to The Royal Society.
Our findings suggest that boys and girls respond differently to caffeine," says neurobiologist Jennifer Temple.

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