neuroanatomy

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neuroanatomy

 [noor″o-ah-nat´o-me]
anatomy of the nervous system.

neu·ro·a·nat·o·my

(nū'rō-ă-nat'ō-mē),
The anatomy of the nervous system, usually specific to the central nervous system.

neuroanatomy

(no͝or′ō-ə-năt′ə-mē, nyo͝or′-)
n. pl. neuroanato·mies
1. The branch of anatomy that deals with the nervous system.
2. The neural structure of a body part or organ: the neuroanatomy of the eye.

neu′ro·an′a·tom′i·cal (-ăn′ə-tŏm′ĭ-kəl) adj.
neu′ro·a·nat′o·mist n.

neu·ro·a·nat·o·my

(nūr'ō-ă-nat'ŏ-mē)
The anatomy of the nervous system, usually specific to the central nervous system.

neuroanatomy

The study of the structure of the nervous system and its relation to function. A knowledge of neuroanatomy is a prerequisite for the diagnosis of neurological diseases and for the accurate location of the LESION causing the disorder.

neu·ro·a·nat·o·my

(nūr'ō-ă-nat'ŏ-mē)
The anatomy of the nervous system, usually specific to the central nervous system.
References in periodicals archive ?
Another part of the human brain extensively analyzed and measured by neuroanatomists is the corpus callosum, a thick bundle of nerves connecting the left and the right cerebral hemispheres.
Modern dualists have not been successful either, and this problem has led many philosophers, psychologists and cognitive scientists in general (who may be neuroanatomists, neurochemists, AI researchers, scientifically trained philosophers) to argue for materialism, the view that denies there is such an entity called "the mind" and claims that there is only one entity, the material brain.
One neuroanatomist, a Berkeley professor named Marian Diamond, had written a paper claiming that she had counted in Einstein's brain a higher than normal number of glial cells, which nourish the organ.
Simon LeVay, a neuroanatomist at the Salk Institute, sliced open the brains of forty-one corpses and determined that among the male subjects thought to be heterosexual the size of the hypothalamus, a microscopic part of the brain associated with sexual behavior, was two times larger than in the corpses of assumed homosexual men or of women of undetermined sexual attractions.