neuroanatomy

(redirected from neuroanatomical)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

neuroanatomy

 [noor″o-ah-nat´o-me]
anatomy of the nervous system.

neu·ro·a·nat·o·my

(nū'rō-ă-nat'ō-mē),
The anatomy of the nervous system, usually specific to the central nervous system.

neuroanatomy

/neu·ro·anat·o·my/ (-ah-nat´ah-me) anatomy of the nervous system.

neuroanatomy

(no͝or′ō-ə-năt′ə-mē, nyo͝or′-)
n. pl. neuroanato·mies
1. The branch of anatomy that deals with the nervous system.
2. The neural structure of a body part or organ: the neuroanatomy of the eye.

neu′ro·an′a·tom′i·cal (-ăn′ə-tŏm′ĭ-kəl) adj.
neu′ro·a·nat′o·mist n.

neuroanatomy

[noo͡r′ō·ənat′əmē]
the branch of biology that is concerned with the structure of the nervous system.

neu·ro·a·nat·o·my

(nūr'ō-ă-nat'ŏ-mē)
The anatomy of the nervous system, usually specific to the central nervous system.

neuroanatomy

The study of the structure of the nervous system and its relation to function. A knowledge of neuroanatomy is a prerequisite for the diagnosis of neurological diseases and for the accurate location of the LESION causing the disorder.

neu·ro·a·nat·o·my

(nūr'ō-ă-nat'ŏ-mē)
The anatomy of the nervous system, usually specific to the central nervous system.

neuroanatomy,

n the gross and microscopic structure of the nervous system.

neuroanatomy

anatomy of the nervous system.
References in periodicals archive ?
Further analyses revealed that the right hemispheric increases of alpha-beta1 power observed in the fixed, unsectioned human brain during exposures to Burst X (3000, 3) were due to one neuroanatomical locus.
This premise is supported by imaging studies that reveal neuroanatomical changes after chemotherapy as well as changes in patterns of neural activation during performance of challenging cognitive tasks.
Prinz backs Robert Zajonc in his dispute with Richard Lazarus and endorses the claim that emotion and cognition involve two distinct neuroanatomical structures.
Investigation of neuroanatomical differences between autism and Asperger syndrome.
Previous work has examined the histology and transcriptomic profiles of 900 neuroanatomical subdivisions (Nature 2012;489:391-9) of two adult human brains that characterized the transcriptomic relationships between different cell types and different cell regions.
The second article discusses the neuroanatomical correlates of spirituality and ti religion.
From the neuroanatomical viewpoint, these findings suggest that gastrodin may cause the elevation of GABA concentration by inhibiting the GABA shunt.
Our analysis complements the growing literature on the functioning of neural mechanisms of aggression, the neuroanatomical organization of aggression, the complex nature of aggressive behavior, and the neurobiological mechanisms of aggressive behavior.
In chapter three, the last stop before the most arduous section of the book, readers are offered a neuroanatomical tour.
In recent decades, progress has been achieved in the imaging of neuroanatomical structures associated with depressive disorder and response to antidepressant therapy.