neurasthenic


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neur·as·then·ic

(nūr'as-then'ik),
Relating to, or suffering from, neurasthenia.

neur·as·then·ic

(nūr'as-then'ik)
Relating to, or suffering from, neurasthenia.

neurasthenic

(nū-răs-thē′nĭk)
1. Individual suffering from neurasthenia.
2. Suffering from or concerning neurasthenia.
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Building the evolution of Ghighi's destiny, the writer seems to follow closely the scientific markers concerning the likelihood or unlikelihood of survival in the case of the exceedingly vulnerable structure of the neurasthenic. "When he can abstract himself, create for himself an environment in which the noise of the outside life would be dulled, he manages to live without too much pain.
The words "wanders," "lost," and "reverie" portray the wayward spirit of a neurasthenic person in similar terms as a traveler or as a creative soul (42).
After unravelling the complex narrative of this medical intervention using the genealogical method, it can be argued that if we are to understand this particular technology for governing addicted bodies, then we need to consider the multiple and heterogeneous events, discourses and biopolitical strategies that coalesced around the (neurasthenic) body at the end of the 19th and beginning of the 20th Century.
evidence" would be to risk neurasthenic consequences in the reader.
A detailed comparison of the symptoms of the 88 subjects given a diagnosis of neurasthenia in the national survey with subjects who had other neurotic disorders found that it was not possible to identify a unique symptom cluster that could distinguish neurasthenic patients from patients with other neurotic disorders.
agency, figured by the neurasthenic woman, was countered by the New
In Section Two, 'A Game of Chess' an allusion to the splendour of Cleopatra ('The Chair she sat in, like a burnished') is juxtaposed with the pretentiousness of the neurasthenic woman.
Neurasthenic Nation: America's Search for Health, Happiness, and Comfort, 1869-1920.
But in parallel to this bigendering, it is to the idea of nervous defects that Proust's text returns again and again, the "defectuosites nerveuses" (artp 3: 344) of Charlus, the "nervosite nehante" (artp 3: 669) of the neurasthenic Morel which has him committing cruel acts, and compensating for them by weeping uncontrollably afterwards.
Neurasthenic patients tend to experience a variety of other symptoms, such as dizziness, tension headaches, and feelings of general instability.
An intelligent smile widens his left nostril and lifts the corner of a lip revealing much neurasthenic science.
Thus, through this historically convoluted move, Zangwill covertly turned his neurasthenic Ashkenazic protagonist into an aristocrat like the Russian Vera.