neurasthenic


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neur·as·then·ic

(nūr'as-then'ik),
Relating to, or suffering from, neurasthenia.

neur·as·then·ic

(nūr'as-then'ik)
Relating to, or suffering from, neurasthenia.

neurasthenic

(nū-răs-thē′nĭk)
1. Individual suffering from neurasthenia.
2. Suffering from or concerning neurasthenia.
References in periodicals archive ?
All in all, "neurasthenia may lead to suicide; the neurasthenics being, in fact, by their temperament, seemingly destined to suffer.
The words "wanders," "lost," and "reverie" portray the wayward spirit of a neurasthenic person in similar terms as a traveler or as a creative soul (42).
But in parallel to this bigendering, it is to the idea of nervous defects that Proust's text returns again and again, the "defectuosites nerveuses" (artp 3: 344) of Charlus, the "nervosite nehante" (artp 3: 669) of the neurasthenic Morel which has him committing cruel acts, and compensating for them by weeping uncontrollably afterwards.
Neurasthenic patients tend to experience a variety of other symptoms, such as dizziness, tension headaches, and feelings of general instability.
An intelligent smile widens his left nostril and lifts the corner of a lip revealing much neurasthenic science.
Both even suffered from neurasthenic symptoms of paralysis, the civilian's equivalent to the soldier's war trauma.
Thus, through this historically convoluted move, Zangwill covertly turned his neurasthenic Ashkenazic protagonist into an aristocrat like the Russian Vera.
Between meals with his forbearing wife Katia and their countless eccentric, neurasthenic offspring, Mann would scribe off more warnings to himself about the shadowy, ever nigh-drawing reach of the Fuhrer--each entry exquisitely phrased in highly figurative terms of foreboding--then note with reserved pleasure that the Festschrift edition being printed in his honor had made it safely across the Alps.
For many years she was treated for, among the others, neurasthenic neurosis and general nervous breakdown, discopathy, malignant bone disease (she had two operations due to this), obtaining II group disability pension for general health condition.
These symptoms fall into four categories: affective (depressed mood and feelings of worthlessness), behavioral (social withdrawal and slowness), cognitive (difficulty with concentration or making decisions), and somatic symptoms (insomnia or hypersomnia and neurasthenic symptoms).
The Woodlanders poses a question which compels us to rethink Wordsworth's polemical tactics: what if a yeoman's "strength" of "feeling" for a tree transcended a staunch pride in native "associations" (KWR 345) and gave way to eruptive irritability, even neurasthenic torment?