neurasthenia


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neurasthenia

 [noor″as-the´ne-ah]
a virtually obsolete term formerly used to describe a vague disorder marked by chronic abnormal fatigability, moderate depression, inability to concentrate, loss of appetite, insomnia, and other symptoms. Popularly called nervous prostration. adj., adj neurasthen´ic.

neur·as·the·ni·a

(nūr'as-thē'nē-ă),
An ill-defined condition, commonly accompanying or following depression, characterized by vague fatigue believed to be brought on by psychological factors.
[neur- + G. astheneia, weakness]

neurasthenia

(no͝or′əs-thē′nē-ə, nyo͝or′-)
n.
A group of symptoms, including chronic physical and mental fatigue, weakness, and generalized aches and pains, formerly thought to result from exhaustion of the nervous system and now usually considered a psychological disorder. The term is no longer in clinical use in many parts of the world.

neu′ras·then′ic (-thĕn′ĭk) adj. & n.
neu′ras·then′i·cal·ly adv.

neurasthenia

Medical history
A condition described in the late 1800s as being uniquely American, believed to most commonly affect those who performed cerebral work (e.g., physicians, lawyers and inventors), which is now known as stress. Reported findings included a loss of interest in mental labour and heart disturbances. Neurasthenia was viewed as a reflection of the natural superiority of the American culture and a product of the progress and refinement of modern civilisation; treatments included cold water cures, diets, exercise, arsenic and many others.

neurasthenia

Psychology Effort syndrome A nonspecific finding, often associated with depression or anxiety disorders, characterized by fatigue, and inability to function Accompaniments Autonomic changes–eg, tachycardia, sighing, blushing, dysdiaphoresis; Pts may believe neurasthenia is organic, not psychological

neur·as·the·ni·a

(nūr'as-thē'nē-ă)
An ill-defined condition, commonly accompanying or following depression, characterized by vague fatigue believed to be brought on by psychological factors.
[neur- + G. astheneia, weakness]

neurasthenia

A state of constant fatigue, loss of motivation and energy and often insomnia and muscle aches associated with general and persistent unhappiness. In the present state of knowledge, and in the absence of any evidence of a cause, the state described as neurasthenia is considered not to be of organic origin and, in particular, to have nothing to do with nerve function.

Neurasthenia

A term coined in the late nineteenth century to refer to a condition of chronic mental and physical weakness and fatigue. Some researchers regard MCS as a twentieth-century version of neurasthenia.

neur·as·the·ni·a

(nūr'as-thē'nē-ă)
An ill-defined condition, commonly accompanying or following depression, characterized by vague fatigue believed to be brought on by psychological factors.
[neur- + G. astheneia, weakness]
References in periodicals archive ?
Neurasthenia: Prevalence, disability and health care characteristics in the Australian community.
Their presentation of the issue of 'nerves' also strikes at the contemporary enthusiasm for the allied diagnosis of neurasthenia, which was presented as a respectable condition experienced by middle-class people who were overwhelmed by the pace of modern life.
Nineteenth-century doctors believed that the symptoms of neurasthenia included deficient mental control and the inability to concentrate.
The term neurasthenia has largely fallen out of favor and been replaced with the term neurosis.
This ethics of living was underpinned by a key governmental rationality that was deployed for securing the population from the "modern condition" of neurasthenia. Neurasthenia, as others have pointed out, was a governing principle from this period (Armstrong, 1983; Courtwright, 2005; Hickman, 2004).
Coca-Cola was originally developed in 1886 as a patent medicine containing cocaine to treat morphine addiction, dyspepsia, neurasthenia, headache, and impotence.
In 25% of cases the depression vignette was misclassified as 'neurasthenia', in 27% of cases positive-symptom schizophrenia was misclassified as depression, and in 24% of cases mania was misclassified as schizophrenia.
Rees begins treatment of his thesis by painfully introducing us to the nervous disorder Neurasthenia. Rees based his discussion of Neurasthenia on psychologist George Beard's 1881 book, American Nervousness.
suggested that neurasthenia had more to do with the rapid pace of modern
Arguing that metre's disposition to regulation and order was both embraced and challenged by those poet-soldiers treated at Craiglockhart War Hospital, Martin reads the metres of both poets within the context of the psychological rupture in language caused by trauma and those treatments for neurasthenia prescribed by W.