neurasthenia


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neurasthenia

 [noor″as-the´ne-ah]
a virtually obsolete term formerly used to describe a vague disorder marked by chronic abnormal fatigability, moderate depression, inability to concentrate, loss of appetite, insomnia, and other symptoms. Popularly called nervous prostration. adj., adj neurasthen´ic.

neur·as·the·ni·a

(nūr'as-thē'nē-ă),
An ill-defined condition, commonly accompanying or following depression, characterized by vague fatigue believed to be brought on by psychological factors.
[neur- + G. astheneia, weakness]

neurasthenia

/neu·ras·the·nia/ (-as-the´ne-ah) a term virtually obsolete in Western medicine but still used in traditional Chinese medicine, denoting a mental disorder marked by chronic weakness and easy fatigability.

neurasthenia

(no͝or′əs-thē′nē-ə, nyo͝or′-)
n.
A group of symptoms, including chronic physical and mental fatigue, weakness, and generalized aches and pains, formerly thought to result from exhaustion of the nervous system and now usually considered a psychological disorder. The term is no longer in clinical use in many parts of the world.

neu′ras·then′ic (-thĕn′ĭk) adj. & n.
neu′ras·then′i·cal·ly adv.

neurasthenia

[noo͡r′əsthē′nē·ə]
Etymology: Gk, neuron + a + sthenos, without strength
1 an abnormal condition that often follows depression, characterized by nervous exhaustion and a vague functional fatigue.
2 (in psychiatry) a stage in the recovery from a schizophrenic experience during which the patient is listless and apparently unable to cope with routine activities and relationships. neurasthenic, adj.

neurasthenia

Medical history
A condition described in the late 1800s as being uniquely American, believed to most commonly affect those who performed cerebral work (e.g., physicians, lawyers and inventors), which is now known as stress. Reported findings included a loss of interest in mental labour and heart disturbances. Neurasthenia was viewed as a reflection of the natural superiority of the American culture and a product of the progress and refinement of modern civilisation; treatments included cold water cures, diets, exercise, arsenic and many others.

neurasthenia

Psychology Effort syndrome A nonspecific finding, often associated with depression or anxiety disorders, characterized by fatigue, and inability to function Accompaniments Autonomic changes–eg, tachycardia, sighing, blushing, dysdiaphoresis; Pts may believe neurasthenia is organic, not psychological

neur·as·the·ni·a

(nūr'as-thē'nē-ă)
An ill-defined condition, commonly accompanying or following depression, characterized by vague fatigue believed to be brought on by psychological factors.
[neur- + G. astheneia, weakness]

neurasthenia

A state of constant fatigue, loss of motivation and energy and often insomnia and muscle aches associated with general and persistent unhappiness. In the present state of knowledge, and in the absence of any evidence of a cause, the state described as neurasthenia is considered not to be of organic origin and, in particular, to have nothing to do with nerve function.

Neurasthenia

A term coined in the late nineteenth century to refer to a condition of chronic mental and physical weakness and fatigue. Some researchers regard MCS as a twentieth-century version of neurasthenia.

neurasthenia (nerˑ·s·thēˑ·nē·),

n term introduced by the American neurologist GM Beard to describe a condition characterized by irritability, lack of concentration, hypochondria, and worry.

neur·as·the·ni·a

(nūr'as-thē'nē-ă)
An ill-defined condition, commonly accompanying or following depression, characterized by vague fatigue believed to be brought on by psychological factors.
[neur- + G. astheneia, weakness]

neurasthenia (nyoo´rəsthē´nēə),

n a neurotic reaction characterized by chronic physical fatigue, listlessness, mental sluggishness, and, often, phobias.
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The spa visitors are too refined to talk about sex, but patients' records of the time from various sanatoriums and asylums in Germany indicate that similar types of nervous conditions, gathered together under the diagnosis of neurasthenia, were 'all about sex'.
Nineteenth-century physicians also indicated a connection between neurasthenia and altered perception.
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However, this was an important historical period when neurasthenia was a driving force behind the government of the population (Armstrong, 1987).
peak of neurasthenia as a phenomenon, and 1903 was certainly an
She shows how the evidence of neurasthenia was viewed by physicians
Doctors used the diagnosis of neurasthenia to garner greater authority and to "cultivate a community of middle and upper class patients," who, in turn, could strengthen the profession (35).
50 male and female patients with neurasthenia (ICD-b F480), post-traumatic stress disorder (PSD: F43.
Walker's interests in neurasthenia and nervous disorder has its own family resonances.
An instance of nineteenth-century camp resorting (akin to revival camp meetings and educational camp meetings like Chautauqua), the Bohemian Grove and its rituals were created as an antidote to the enervating nature of modern life in response to fears about male neurasthenia.
Of particular interest is the way this view was incorporated into tourist guides that advertised Newfoundland and Labrador as a tonic for urban North Americans suffering from neurasthenia (96-97).
3) As he documented additional cases of Protestant decline and neurasthenia, the reflections he offered on the cause or causes were connected, importantly though not solely, to his thoughts about periodization.