neurapraxia


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Related to neurapraxia: axonotmesis, Neuropraxia

neurapraxia

 [noor″ah-prak´se-ah]
failure of nerve conduction in the absence of structural changes, due to blunt injury, compression, or ischemia.

neur·a·prax·i·a

(nūr'ă-prak'sē-ă), Avoid the misspelling/mispronunciation neuropraxia. Avoid the jargonistic use of this word in the general sense of 'nerve lesion'.
The mildest type of focal nerve lesion that produces clinical deficits; localized loss of conduction along a nerve without axon degeneration; caused by a focal lesion, usually demyelinating, but occasionally ischemic (when of shorter than a few hours' duration), followed by a complete recovery.
See also: axonotmesis.
[neur- + G. a- priv. + praxis, action]

neurapraxia

Neurology Partial or complete conduction block over a segment of a nerve fiber, with temporary paralysis. See Cervical cord neurapraxia, Chronic recurrent root neurapraxia.

neu·ra·prax·i·a

(nūr'ă-prak'sē-ă)
The mildest type of focal nerve lesion that produces clinical deficits; localized loss of conduction along a nerve without axon degeneration; caused by a focal lesion, usually demyelinating, and followed by a complete recovery.
See also: axonotmesis
[neur-+ G. a- priv. + praxis, action]

neurapraxia

A peripheral nerve injury featuring temporary failure of conduction of impulses, usually due to compression without severance.

neu·ra·prax·i·a

(nūr'ă-prak'sē-ă)
Mildest type of focal nerve lesion that produces clinical deficits.
[neur- + G. a- priv. + praxis, action]
References in periodicals archive ?
Surgical procedures of the hip and knee may be associated with neurapraxia (8).
Congenital spinal stenosis associated with cord neurapraxia is a contraindication to sports participation, although there is some controversy over whether it should be considered absolute or relative.
By comparison, the overall structural complication rate for open carpal tunnel surgery was 0.88%, with a digital nerve injury incidence rate of 0.34%, transient neurapraxia rate of 0.35%, and median and ulnar nerve laceration rate of 0.13%.
((d)- (e)) Poor clinical outcome especially in forward elevation due to axillary nerve neurapraxia. (f) Clinical picture of the wound at 17 months after surgery.
(1) Our patient, who had a minor whiplash injury, was asymptomatic for more than four hours before developing neurapraxia like features, lasting for less than two hours.
We have identified four neurologic injuries; two mild transient distal brachial plexopathy issues that fully resolved by 12 weeks; one partial axillary neurapraxia that resolved by 6 weeks; one complete axillary neurapraxia that had significant motor weakness at 12 weeks, but completely resolved by 6 months.
Case 2 describes a patient with mild brachial plexus neurapraxia, which was most likely due to compression by shoulder braces (to prevent cephalad sliding during the Exaggerated head-down tilt.
In cases of neurapraxia or axonotmesis (even partial), some axons remain intact with their normal abductor or adductor function.
There were no instances of skin loss or necrosis, but neurapraxia lasting as long as 10 weeks and reperfusion pain were documented.
Immediately after surgery, she suffered from hypoesthesia in the groin and mild adductor weakness due to neurapraxia of the obturator nerve.
(9) A study by Seddon led to clinical identification and classification of such injuries into a three graded system (neurapraxia, axonotmesis and neurotmesis).