neuraminidase


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Related to neuraminidase: sialic acid, Neuraminidase inhibitor

sialidase

 [si-al´ĭ-dās]
1. an enzyme of the hydrolase class that catalyzes the cleavage of glucosidic linkages between a sialic acid residue and a hexose or hexosamine residue at the nonreducing terminal of oligosaccharides in glycoproteins, glycolipids, and proteoglycans. Deficiency of it is an autosomal recessive trait and is seen in sialidosis and galactosialidosis.
2. the enzyme with this activity specifically cleaving sialic acid–containing gangliosides; it is deficient in mucolipidosis IV. Called also neuraminidase.

si·al·i·dase

(sī-al'i-dās),
An enzyme that catalyzes the hydrolysis of terminal acetylneuraminic residues from oligosaccharides, glycoproteins, or glycolipids; present on the surface antigen in myxoviruses; used in histochemistry to selectively remove sialomucins, as from bronchial mucous glands and the small intestine; a deficiency of this enzyme produces sialidosis.
Synonym(s): neuraminidase

neuraminidase

/neu·ra·min·i·dase/ (-ah-min´ĭ-dās) an enzyme of the surface coat of myxoviruses that destroys the neuraminic acid of the cell surface during attachment, thereby preventing hemagglutination.

neuraminidase

(no͝or′ə-mĭn′ĭ-dās′, -dāz′, nyo͝or′-)
n.
A hydrolytic enzyme that removes sialic acid from glycoproteins and is found in many cells and viruses. It occurs on the surface of influenza viruses and enables the release of newly replicated viruses from infected cells.

neuraminidase

[noo͡r′əmē′nədās]
an enzyme that catalyzes the cleavage of N-acetyl neuraminic acid from mucopolysaccharides. A hereditary deficiency of the enzyme causes sialidosis and is associated with galactogialidosis; it is characterized by mental retardation and skeletal changes, especially dysotosis multiplex. Also called sialidase. See also sialidosis.

neuraminidase

1. an enzyme that cleaves the terminal N-acetylneuraminic acid from mucoproteins.
2. a structural component occurring as a spike in the envelope of ortho- and paramyxoviruses.
References in periodicals archive ?
Detection of influenza viruses resistant to neuraminidase inhibitors in global surveillance during the first 3 years of their use.
Mutation analysis of the DNA sample obtained from this patient revealed point mutation in exon 1 of the neuraminidase gene.
So basically all that physicians had available early on were the oral neuraminidase inhibitor oseltamivir (Tamiflu) and the inhalation-only formulation of zanamivir (Relenza), another neuraminidase inhibitor.
Because viral isolation was unsuccessful, a neuraminidase inhibition assay was not performed.
335] virus has 11 times higher neuraminidase activity than does [HN-E.
Resistance to the drug is due to mutations of the viral haemagglutinin and/or neuraminidase.
Writing in the British Medical Journal (BMJ), they said just one mutation could lead to a flu strain resistant to neuraminidase inhibitors or ion channel inhibitors.
The two letters in this code name stand for the two proteins, or strings of chemicals called amino acids, that form the virus's coating: Hemagglutinin and Neuraminidase.
has signed an agreement with Green Cross Corporation, South Korea for the development and commercialization in Korea of peramivir, BioCryst's potent influenza neuraminidase inhibitor.
Peramivir is a neuraminidase inhibitor, as are the currently used drugs Tamiflu and Relenza; however, its manufacturer claims that this drug will be easier and cheaper to produce than available drugs.
In particular, seasonal and pandemic influenza can be treated with neuraminidase inhibitors.
Type A is likely to undergo an antigenic shift if two or more subtypes infect a single host, creating new subtypes based on surface antigens hemagglutinin (H) and neuraminidase (N).