net assimilation rate

net assimilation rate

a measurement of plant growth (weight increase per unit time) by assessing change in a particular part of the plant (usually leaf area) rather than in the overall plant.
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1]) was determined by the relationship between the net assimilation rate and the transpiration rate (A/E), and the apparent carboxylation efficiency (A/[C.
Similarly, the highest average net assimilation rate was recorded with compost (1124 kg ha-1) + fertilizer (42:28:28 kg NPK ha-1) application, however, there was considerable difference recorded among treatment means in this regard (Fig.
Passiflora cincinnata, Passiflora mucronata, Passiflora giberti, Passiflora morifolia and Passiflora edulis (control) developed in polyvinyl chloride tubes of 100 mm in diameter and 150 cm in height, in order to assess plant height, leaf area, number of secondary roots, stem diameter, taproot lenght, root system volume, absolute growth rate, relative growth rate, net assimilation rate, leaf mass ratio and root mass ratio, at 30, 45, 60, 75, 90 and 105 days after transplanting.
Net assimilation rate (NAR) was significantly affected by foliar application of potassium and zinc as compared to remaining combinations (Table 3).
Direct measures of growth such as dry weight, leaf area, and time are used for the quantitative analysis of plant growth, and the following rates are calculated, among others: relative growth rate, crop growth rate, net assimilation rate, leaf area index, and leaf area duration.
The net assimilation rate (NAR) was influenced in rice as crop advances in growth, particularly during flowering to harvest stage in both the years of study (Table 1).
Mean accumulated radiation interception (754, 736 and 784 MJm-2) was assessed in genotypes (Iqbal-2000, Chenab-2000 and Aqab-2000), respectively but not significant effect on net assimilation rate.
Net assimilation rate curves exhibited a similar trend for all different irrigation treatments and cultivars.
The Net assimilation rate (NAR) and the mean transpiration rate (MTR) were calculated as follows:
After the final harvest, relative growth rate (RGR), leaf area ratio (LAR), and net assimilation rate (NAR) were determined as in Chiarello et al.
Results showed that maize planted (alternate-rows) simultaneously with cowpea and soybean recorded significantly higher values of leaf area index (LAI), leaf area ratio (LAR) and net assimilation rate (NAR).