obturator nerve

(redirected from nervus obturatorius)
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ob·tu·ra·tor nerve

[TA]
arises from the lumbar plexus, conveying fibers from the second, third, and fourth lumbar nerves in the psoas muscle, crosses the brim of the pelvis, and enters the thigh through the obturator canal; it supplies muscles of the medial compartment of the thigh (adductors of thigh at the hip joint) and terminates as the cutaneous branch of the obturator nerve, supplying a small area of medial thigh above knee.
Synonym(s): nervus obturatorius [TA]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

ob·tu·ra·tor nerve

(ob'tŭr-ā-tŏr nĕrv) [TA]
Arises from the second, third, and fourth lumbar nerves in the psoas muscle, crosses the brim of the pelvis, and enters the thigh through the obturator canal; it supplies muscles of the medial compartment of the thigh (adductors of thigh at the hip joint) and terminates as the cutaneous branch of the obturator nerve, supplying a small area of medial thigh above knee.
Synonym(s): nervus obturatorius [TA] .
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

obturator nerve

A motor nerve originating in the lumbar plexus and composed of axons from spinal cord segments L2–L4. It passes into the thigh through the obturator foramen of the pelvic bones and innervates the adductor longus, adductor brevis, gracilis, pectineus, obturator externus, and adductor magnus muscles.
See also: nerve
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners