nerve-sparing


Also found in: Acronyms.

nerve-sparing

(nĕrv′spar″ing)
Operating without removing or injuring nerves adjacent to or within the organ being removed from the body. In prostatectomy, a nerve-sparing procedure preserves the parasympathetic and sympathetic nerves that control penile erection and ejaculation.
References in periodicals archive ?
But laparoscopic retroperitoneal nerve-sparing surgery should be performed only by skilled neuroanatomy surgeons at referral centers because of the complex nature of the procedure, he noted.
The continence rates were found to be statistically significantly higher in patients who underwent nerve-sparing surgery and in patients treated with classical intrafascial and fascia-preserving intrafascial techniques (p<0.
Many commenters emphasized the importance of the surgeon's level of experience in performing a nerve-sparing prostatectomy.
Since the robotic arms give the surgeon superior precision, this nerve-sparing operation has high rates of bladder control and potency retention.
There were no significant differences among the groups in bilateral nerve-sparing (90% overall), open conversion (2% overall), and positive margins (17% overall).
pioneer of the nerve-sparing prostatectomy procedure and one of the country's leading experts on the disease (see Dr.
13) This same study found improvement in all parameters at 1 year after nerve-sparing surgery.
Men undergoing nerve-sparing prostatectomy experienced fewer effects on sexual function, although urinary incontinence was often seen after the surgery.
Five small, nerve-sparing incisions are made to perform the complex surgeries.
Patrick Walsh, who is acknowledged as the world's foremost authority on prostate cancer and is the inventor of the revolutionary, nerve-sparing surgical technique in which the prostate is removed, but potency and continence are preserved.
Although our sample included fairly large numbers of men who bad newer treatments designed to preserve erectile function--such as bilateral nerve-sparing prostatectomy, radioactive seed implantation, or various types of computer-enhanced radiation therapy--there was little evidence that they had more satisfying results.