nerve biopsy


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nerve biopsy

A biopsy used to evaluate focal neuropathies or systemic disease.
 
Indications
Suspected amyloidosis, sarcoidosis, metabolic polyneuropathy, leprosy, demyelination, alcoholic neuropathy, Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, peroneal nerve dysfunction, mononeuritis multiplex, other polyneuropathies.
 
Sites
Ankle, wrist.
 
Special studies
Biochemical analysis, EM, histology, immunohistochemistry, molecular studies, virology.

nerve biopsy

Neurology A biopsy used to evaluate focal neuropathies or systemic disease Abnormal in Amyloidosis, sarcoidosis, metabolic polyneuropathy, leprosy, demyelination, alcoholic neuropathy, Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, peroneal nerve dysfunction, mononeuritis multiplex, other polyneuropathies Sites Ankle, wrist Special studies Biochemical analysis, EM, histology, immunohistochemistry, molecular, virology

Nerve biopsy

A medical test in which a small portion of a damaged nerve is surgically removed and examined under a microscope.
Mentioned in: Peripheral Neuropathy
References in periodicals archive ?
Nerve biopsy of our first case showed signs of leprosy and electrophysiological tests in both, suggested a sensory-motor, axonal polyneuro-pathy with secondary demyelination.
Giant axons found in nerve biopsy, and gene test can help in making the diagnosis.
Caption: Figure 3: Sural nerve biopsy of a mixed myelin-axonal damage CMT1A patient showing features of typical onion bulb lesions and regeneration clusters (black arrow).
Relapse will be defined by the presence of new signs and symptoms or new finding of AFBs in skin or nerve biopsy. Relapse rates after MDT are typically low (< 1%), but may be higher, depending on the treatment regimen, duration of follow up and if it was determined by physical examination, skin smear or biopsy.
In patients with CIP the pain stimulus is not properly transmitted to the central nervous system due to an alteration of the structure or function of the sensory pathways that becomes evident as abnormalities on NCS and nerve biopsy (1,3-6).
Axonal neuropathy was diagnosed by electrophysiology and nerve biopsy findings with active axonal degeneration, mild fiber loss and without inflammation.
As already explained above, the peripheral nerve biopsy is completely normal.
Coverage encompasses MRI-targeted fascicular nerve biopsy, scientific reports on new molecular genetic insights, and autonomic disorders, with the bulk of the chapters consisting of illustrated case studies on the evaluation and management of the most common peripheral nerve disorders, with discussion of diagnosis, clinical features, imaging, histopathology, and other aspects.
A sural nerve biopsy can distinguish inflammatory and genetic neuropathies.
The data were further supported by sural nerve biopsy and cutaneous nerve biopsy studies (Kuo et al.
Chemically, they consist of abnormally branched glycogen with small amounts of protein, sulfate, and phosphate groups.[3] The diagnosis can be made by light microscopic evaluation of a sural nerve biopsy. It has been suggested, however, that the diagnosis can be established by a less invasive skin biopsy revealing similar inclusions in myoepithelial cells of apocrine glands.[4]