nephrosclerosis


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Related to nephrosclerosis: malignant nephrosclerosis

nephrosclerosis

 [nef″ro-sklĕ-ro´sis]
hardening of the kidney, usually associated with hypertension and disease of the renal arterioles. It is characterized as benign or malignant depending on the severity and rapidity of the hypertension and arteriolar changes.
arteriolar nephrosclerosis that involving chiefly the arterioles, with degeneration of the renal tubules and fibrotic thickening of the glomeruli; it has an insidious onset and is characterized by cylindruria, edema, hypertrophy of the heart, degeneration of the renal tubules, and glomerulonephritis. Types include benign and malignant arteriolar nephrosclerosis.
benign nephrosclerosis (benign arteriolar nephrosclerosis) arteriolar nephrosclerosis usually seen in patients over 60 years old and associated with benign hypertension and hyaline arteriolosclerosis. In younger persons, it may occur in diabetics with a predisposition to arteriolosclerosis and in those who have hypertension resulting from an apparent underlying disease, such as pheochromocytoma.
hypertensive nephrosclerosis the most common kind of arteriolar nephrosclerosis, due to hypertension of the renal arterioles.
malignant nephrosclerosis (malignant arteriolar nephrosclerosis) an uncommon form of arteriolar nephrosclerosis affecting all the vessels of the body, especially the small arteries and arterioles of the kidneys, and frequently associated with malignant hypertension and hyperplastic arteriolosclerosis. Renal changes include arteriolar necrosis with red blood cells and casts in the urine. It may occur in the absence of previous history of hypertension, or may be superimposed on benign hypertension or primary renal disease, especially glomerulonephritis, benign nephrosclerosis, and pyelonephritis.

neph·ro·scle·ro·sis

(nef'rō-sklĕ-rō'sis),
Fibrosis of the kidney from overgrowth and contraction of the interstitial connective tissue.
[nephro- + G. sklērōsis, hardening]

nephrosclerosis

Global fibrosis and atrophy of glomeruli, most common in atherosclerotic kidneys.

Benign nephrosclerosis
A relatively common, symmetrical and indolent process causing benign hypertension. Average age of onset is 60, 5% of whom die of renal failure.
 
Pathology
Hyaline arteriolosclerosis, scarring of glomeruli.
 
Malignant nephrosclerosis
An uncommon process affecting 5% of hypertensives, often beginning < age 45.
 
Pathology
Fibrinoid necrosis of small arteries (necrotising arteriolitis); intimal hyperplasia of larger interlobular arteries (hyperplastic arteriolitis); “onion-skinning”; collagen deposition and fibroblastic proliferation with luminal narrowing; thrombosis and necrosis of the glomeruli with atrophy and parenchymal scarring

nephrosclerosis

Arteriolonephrosclerosis Global fibrosis and atrophy of glomeruli, most common in atherosclerotic kidneys. See Malignant.

neph·ro·scle·ro·sis

(nef'rō-skle-rō'sis)
Induration of the kidney from overgrowth and contraction of the interstitial connective tissue.
[nephro- + G. sklērōsis, hardening]
References in periodicals archive ?
Key Words: Hypertensive nephrosclerosis, chronic kidney disease, renal replacement therapy, blood pressure.
IgAN, primary IgA nephropathy; HTN, hypertensive nephrosclerosis; MN, membranous nephropathy; MCD, minimal change disease; TIN, tubulointerstitial nephritis; RA, renal amyloidosis; MPGN, mesangial proliferative glomerulonephritis; CrGN, crescentic glomerulonephritis; ATN, acute tubular necrosis; CIN, chronic interstitial nephritis; FSGS, focal segmental glomerular sclerosis.
Sanders, "Cytochrome c mediates apoptosis in hypertensive nephrosclerosis in Dahl/Rapp rats," Kidney International, vol.
In the bivariate analysis results, there were significant association between hypertensive nephrosclerosis (p=0.040), diabetes mellitus (p=0.050) and pre-existing CVD (p=0.024) with the occurrence of new CVD events (Table-II).
A 55-year-old patient had been on regular hemodyalsis since 1996 (home hemodialysis since 2001) due to hypertensive nephrosclerosis. He was dialyzed for 5 hours, three times per week using high-flux polysilfone membranes.
This contrast agent can lead to nephrosclerosis in patients with renal insufficiency.
65 patients with CKD 1-5D stage were included in the study: 25--with chronic glomerulonephritis, 20--tubulointerstitial nephritis 20--hypertensive nephrosclerosis (33 men and 32 women, 20-65 years old, mean age at enrollment was 41[+ or -]6,7 years).The control group consisted of 15 volunteers the same average age and sex.
Lead is also known as a risk factor for renal function [3], where it produces a proximal tubular alteration, which results in a leakage of low molecular weight proteins causing, moderate renal failure due to nephrosclerosis and cortical atrophy [4].
The causes of kidney disease were chronic glomerular nephritis (31%), diabetic nephropathy (14%), hypertensive nephrosclerosis (33%), and other causes (22%).
In all proximal tubulopathies glomerular and vascular compartments were unremarkable, except when other nonrelated lesions were present, such as vascular nephrosclerosis, which was common in the patient population because of age.
In November 2013, he was diagnosed with liver cirrhosis and chronic kidney disease secondary to hypertensive nephrosclerosis.