nephropathy


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nephropathy

 [nĕ-frop´ah-the]
1. any disease of the kidneys. adj., adj nephropath´ic.
2. any disease of the kidneys; see also nephritis. Called also nephrosis. adj., adj nephropath´ic.
AIDS nephropathy former name for HIV-associated nephropathy.
analgesic nephropathy interstitial nephritis with renal papillary necrosis, seen in patients with a history of abuse of analgesics such as aspirin or acetaminophen alone or in combination.
diabetic nephropathy the nephropathy that commonly accompanies later stages of diabetes mellitus; it begins with hyperfiltration, renal hypertrophy, microalbuminuria, and hypertension; in time proteinuria develops, with other signs of decreasing function leading to end-stage renal disease.
gouty nephropathy any of a group of chronic kidney diseases associated with the abnormal production and excretion of uric acid.
heavy metal nephropathy the kidney damage resulting from any of various forms of heavy metal poisoning, usually in the form of tubulointerstitial nephritis. The most common metals involved are cadmium, lead, and mercury.
HIV-associated nephropathy renal pathology in patients infected with the human immunodeficiency virus, similar to focal segmental glomerulosclerosis, with proteinuria, enlarged kidneys, and dilated tubules containing proteinaceous casts; it may progress to end-stage renal disease within weeks.
hypokalemic nephropathy nephropathy with hypokalemia, interstitial nephritis, swelling and vacuolization of proximal renal tubules, and progressive renal failure, resulting from conditions such as oncotic overloading of the kidney filtration mechanisms by sugars. See also potassium-losing nephropathy.
IgA nephropathy a chronic form marked by hematuria and proteinuria and by deposits of IgA immunoglobulin in the mesangial areas of the renal glomeruli, with subsequent reactive hyperplasia of mesangial cells. Called also Berger's disease and IgA glomerulonephritis.
ischemic nephropathy nephropathy resulting from partial or complete obstruction of a renal artery with ischemia, accompanied by a significant reduction in the glomerular filtration rate.
lead nephropathy the kidney damage that accompanies lead poisoning; lead deposits appear in the epithelium of the proximal tubules and as nuclear inclusions in cells. In time this leads to tubulointerstitial nephritis with chronic renal failure and other symptoms.
membranous nephropathy membranous glomerulonephritis.
minimal change nephropathy minimal change disease.
obstructive nephropathy nephropathy caused by obstruction of the urinary tract (usually the ureter), with hydronephrosis, slowing of the glomerular filtration rate, and tubular abnormalities.
potassium-losing nephropathy hypokalemic nephropathy after persistent potassium loss; it may be seen in metabolic alkalosis, adrenocortical hormone excess, or in intrinsic renal disease such as renal tubular acidosis or hyperplasia of juxtaglomerular cells. Called also potassium-losing nephritis.
reflux nephropathy childhood pyelonephritis in which the renal scarring results from vesicoureteric reflux, with radiological appearance of intrarenal reflux.
salt-losing nephropathy intrinsic renal disease causing abnormal urinary sodium loss in persons ingesting normal amounts of sodium chloride, with vomiting, dehydration, and vascular collapse. Called also salt-losing nephritis.
urate nephropathy (uric acid nephropathy) any of a group of kidney diseases occurring in patients with hyperuricemia, including an acute form, a chronic form (gouty nephropathy), and nephrolithiasis with formation of uric acid calculi.

ne·phrop·a·thy

(ne-frop'ă-thē),
Any disease of the kidney.
Synonym(s): nephropathia, nephrosis (1)
[nephro- + G. pathos, suffering]

nephropathy

(nə-frŏp′ə-thē)
n. pl. nephropa·thies
A disease or abnormality of the kidney.

neph′ro·path′ic (nĕf′rə-păth′ĭk) adj.

nephropathy

Any disease that affects nephrons.

nephropathy

Kidney disease Nephrology A general term for any disease that affects nephrons. See Analgesic nephropathy, Balkan nephropathy, Contrast-induced nephropathy, HIV nephropathy, IgA nephropathy, Light chain nephropathy, Reflux nephropathy.

ne·phrop·a·thy

(ně-frop'ă-thē)
Any disease of the kidney including inflammatory and degenerative conditions.
Synonym(s): nephropathia, nephrosis (1) .
[nephro- + G. pathos, suffering]

nephropathy

Any disease of the kidney involving observable change.

ne·phrop·a·thy

(ně-frop'ă-thē)
Any disease of the kidney.
[nephro- + G. pathos, suffering]
References in periodicals archive ?
Stahl, "M-type phospholipase A2 receptor autoantibodies and renal function in patients with primary membranous nephropathy," Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology, vol.
This present study aimed at finding out the role of KIM-1, a relatively new marker for diabetic nephropathy. KIM-1 levels progressively rose with the duration of diabetes.
FREE Latest SAMPLE COPY OF "Diabetic Nephropathy Market Research Report- Global forecast till 2023" @ https://www.marketresearchfuture.com/sample_request/5664
American Diabetes Association Journal publication of Pilemann-Lyberg et al study on patients with Type 1 diabetic nephropathy supports uric acid as an independent risk factor - expands XORTX's pipeline under existing patents
RPGN, IgA Nephropathy with superimposed global crescents as well as crescents in the remaining glomeruli with varying stages.
IgA nephropathy (IgAN) and membranous nephropathy were the two most common patterns among patients with NDRD.
Clinical presentation of LN and, Antiphospholipid syndrome nephropathy (APSN)is similar and thus renal biopsy becomes mandatory to differentiate between two conditions.2 LN and APS nephropathy is significant problem because repeated flares may cause cumulative damage that can lead to chronic kidney injury even after adequate therapy.
Our patient had acute kidney injury and newly identified, biopsy-proven IgA nephropathy as previously reported in patients with IgA nephropathy who developed acute kidney injury while being treated with dabigatran.
Coronary angiography and percutaneous coronary intervention performed by using a contrast media causes nephropathy to named contrast induced nephropathy (CIN)1.
Up to 40 per cent of diabetics develop severe kidney manifestation of the disease known as diabetic nephropathy. Diabetic nephropathy is caused by the damage of blood vessel clusters (glomeruli) and other specific cells in the kidney.
IgM nephropathy is described as isolated or dominant IgM deposition which is defined by immunopathological properties similar to IgA nephropathy and displays generalized diffuse distribution in glomerular mesangium.
The most common type of GN was lupus nephritis (33.5%), followed by membranous nephropathy (15.3%), and diabetic nephropathy (11.0%); the least common types of GN were Alport syndrome with an incidence of less than 1% and amyloidosis, crescentic GN, and postinfectious GN with an incidence of 4 (1.9%) each (Table 1, Figure 1).