nephrocalcinosis


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Related to nephrocalcinosis: medullary sponge kidney

nephrocalcinosis

 [nef″ro-kal″sĭ-no´sis]
deposition of calcium phosphate in the renal tubules, resulting in renal insufficiency.

neph·ro·cal·ci·no·sis

(nef'rō-kal'si-nō'sis),
A form of renal lithiasis characterized by diffusely scattered foci of calcification in the renal parenchyma; deposits of calcium phosphate, calcium oxalate monohydrate, and similar compounds are usually demonstrable radiologically.
[nephro- + calcinosis]

nephrocalcinosis

/neph·ro·cal·ci·no·sis/ (-kal″sĭ-no´sis) precipitation of calcium phosphate in the renal tubules, with resultant renal insufficiency.

nephrocalcinosis

[nef′rōkal′sinō′sis]
Etymology: Gk, nephros + L, calx, lime; Gk, osis, condition
an abnormal condition of the kidneys in which deposits of calcium form in the parenchyma at the site of previous inflammation or degenerative change. Infection, hematuria, anal colic, and decreased function of the kidney may occur.

nephrocalcinosis

Nephrology A condition, more common in premature infants, especially if receiving loop diuretics, characterized by calcium oxalate or calcium phosphate deposits in renal tubules and interstitium, resulting in ↓ renal function Etiology Hypercalcemia,↑ Ca2+ excretion, medullary sponge kidney, renal cortical necrosis, renal tubular acidosis, TB Clinical Obstructive uropathy, possibly renal failure. See Kidney stones.

neph·ro·cal·ci·no·sis

(nef'rō-kal-si-nō'sis)
A form of renal lithiasis characterized by diffusely scattered foci of calcification in the renal parenchyma; deposits of calcium phosphate, calcium oxalate monohydrate, and similar compounds are usually demonstrable radiologically.

nephrocalcinosis

The presence of calcification or actual stones within the substance of the kidney.

neph·ro·cal·ci·no·sis

(nef'rō-kal-si-nō'sis)
Renal lithiasis characterized by diffusely scattered foci of calcification in the renal parenchyma.

nephrocalcinosis, (nef´rōkal´sənō´sis),

n an abnormal condition of the kidneys in which deposits of calcium form in the parenchyma at the site of previous inflammation or degenerative change. Infection, hematuria, anal colic, and decreased function of the kidney may occur.

nephrocalcinosis

deposition of calcium phosphate in the renal tubules, resulting in renal insufficiency. Occurs in association with hypercalcemia. in cultivated finfish can be caused by a high CO2 content of the water or by a high calcium:magnesium ratio in the diet.
References in periodicals archive ?
Renal failure due to acute nephrocalcinosis following oral sodium phosphate bowel cleansing.
Our current protocol is to perform haemodialysis 4-5 times per week pre-transplant and for 3 months post transplantation to decrease the oxalate load and to mitigate any damage to the renal allograft by nephrocalcinosis or urolithiasis.
Both kidneys showed focal nephrocalcinosis, with calcification only around tubules, as well as end-stage lupus nephritis (Class VI).
Therefore, episodes of urolithiasis, nephrocalcinosis, recurrent urinary tract infections, or unexplained decline of renal function require assessment of urinary oxalate to exclude PH.
A reduction in nephrocalcinosis and an increase in survival rate was observed in the two lower dose groups.
Rarely, the AKI may follow the oral sodium phosphate exposure within hours; however, nephrocalcinosis is usually not evident so early.
Diagnostic considerations of the renal MRI findings include renal hemosiderosis and cortical nephrocalcinosis.
The pathophysiology appears to involve obstructive calcium phosphate crystalluria and intratubular nephrocalcinosis.
This invariably results in hypercalciuria and nephrocalcinosis, a serious condition characterized by calcium deposition in the kidneys.
Insoluble calcium oxalate salts crystallize in the kidney, leading to urolithiasis and nephrocalcinosis, thereby decreasing renal function, and ultimately leading to end-stage renal failure and systemic oxalosis if treatment is not initiated (3).
This was the case in a patient who was being treated with the heparin analogue pentosan polysulfate in the presence of nephrocalcinosis and in whom hyperkalemia remained refractory, not only to intravenous calcium gluconate, insulin, and glucose, but also to the cation exchange resin calcium resonium.
Because the kidneys are the main pathway for reducing oxalate, hyperoxaluria leads to calcium oxalate kidney stones and nephrocalcinosis, mostly resulting in renal failure in PH1 patients.