nephrocalcinosis


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Related to nephrocalcinosis: medullary sponge kidney

nephrocalcinosis

 [nef″ro-kal″sĭ-no´sis]
deposition of calcium phosphate in the renal tubules, resulting in renal insufficiency.

neph·ro·cal·ci·no·sis

(nef'rō-kal'si-nō'sis),
A form of renal lithiasis characterized by diffusely scattered foci of calcification in the renal parenchyma; deposits of calcium phosphate, calcium oxalate monohydrate, and similar compounds are usually demonstrable radiologically.
[nephro- + calcinosis]

nephrocalcinosis

/neph·ro·cal·ci·no·sis/ (-kal″sĭ-no´sis) precipitation of calcium phosphate in the renal tubules, with resultant renal insufficiency.

nephrocalcinosis

[nef′rōkal′sinō′sis]
Etymology: Gk, nephros + L, calx, lime; Gk, osis, condition
an abnormal condition of the kidneys in which deposits of calcium form in the parenchyma at the site of previous inflammation or degenerative change. Infection, hematuria, anal colic, and decreased function of the kidney may occur.

nephrocalcinosis

Nephrology A condition, more common in premature infants, especially if receiving loop diuretics, characterized by calcium oxalate or calcium phosphate deposits in renal tubules and interstitium, resulting in ↓ renal function Etiology Hypercalcemia,↑ Ca2+ excretion, medullary sponge kidney, renal cortical necrosis, renal tubular acidosis, TB Clinical Obstructive uropathy, possibly renal failure. See Kidney stones.

neph·ro·cal·ci·no·sis

(nef'rō-kal-si-nō'sis)
A form of renal lithiasis characterized by diffusely scattered foci of calcification in the renal parenchyma; deposits of calcium phosphate, calcium oxalate monohydrate, and similar compounds are usually demonstrable radiologically.

nephrocalcinosis

The presence of calcification or actual stones within the substance of the kidney.

neph·ro·cal·ci·no·sis

(nef'rō-kal-si-nō'sis)
Renal lithiasis characterized by diffusely scattered foci of calcification in the renal parenchyma.

nephrocalcinosis, (nef´rōkal´sənō´sis),

n an abnormal condition of the kidneys in which deposits of calcium form in the parenchyma at the site of previous inflammation or degenerative change. Infection, hematuria, anal colic, and decreased function of the kidney may occur.

nephrocalcinosis

deposition of calcium phosphate in the renal tubules, resulting in renal insufficiency. Occurs in association with hypercalcemia. in cultivated finfish can be caused by a high CO2 content of the water or by a high calcium:magnesium ratio in the diet.
References in periodicals archive ?
Other features include hypercalciuria, stone disease, rickets, nephrocalcinosis, and renal failure, with possible foamy urine and bone pain.
The incidence of nephrocalcinosis using sonography is relatively high, but the depositions are almost benign, scanty and very small.
Dent's disease is rare recessive X-linked renal tubular disorder manifesting by proximal tubular dysfunction of different grades, nephrolithiasis, nephrocalcinosis, rickets and slowly progressive renal failure.
Presence of at least one of the findings including nephrolithiasis, nephrocalcinosis, hypophosphatemia, renal failure, amino aciduria, ricketts or positive family history associated with hypercalciuria and LMW proteinuria constitute the clinical diagnostic criteria of Dent's disease (12).
Nephrocalcinosis is a crystalline nephropathy characterized by abundant tubular and interstitial deposits of calcium phosphate, accompanied by varying degrees of acute tubular injury and chronic tubulointerstitial scarring.
Among the systemic manifestations is hypokalemia, nephrocalcinosis core and nephrolithiasis.
Stones Gallstones, kidney stones or nephrocalcinosis
3,10(p40)) Patients with medullary sponge kidney disease, part of the spectrum of medullary cystic diseases, have associated medullary nephrocalcinosis with or without urolithiasis (Figure 2).
The most worrisome potential adverse effects of excessive vitamin D are hypercalcemia, bone demineralization, nephrocalcinosis, and cardiac arrhythmias.
Vitamin D toxicity takes weeks to months to resolve once it develops, and increases the risk of hypercalcemia, hypercalciuria, renal insufficiency, nephrocalcinosis, or kidney stones.
No treatment related adverse events like development of hyperparathyroidism, nephrocalcinosis and episodes of hypercalcaemia were observed.
Other complications are pulmonary hypertension and nephrocalcinosis, nephrolithiasis and nephropathy that lead to renal failure, requiring dialysis and renal transplant (3,4).