neoplasia

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neoplasia

 [ne″o-pla´zhah]
the formation of a neoplasm.
cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) dysplasia of the cervical epithelium, often premalignant, characterized by various degrees of hyperplasia, abnormal keratinization, and the presence of condylomata.
multiple endocrine neoplasia (MEN) a group of rare hereditary disorders of autonomous hyperfunction of more than one endocrine gland. In Type I (MEN I), called also Wermer's syndrome, there are tumors of the pituitary, parathyroid gland, and pancreatic islet cells in association with a high incidence of peptic ulcer. Type II (MEN II), called also Sipple's syndrome, is characterized by medullary carcinoma of the thyroid, pheochromocytoma, often bilateral and multiple, and parathyroid hyperplasia. Type III (MEN III), called also mucosal neuroma syndrome, resembles Type II except that parathyroid hyperplasia is rare, the mean survival time is shorter, and there may be neuromas and neurofibromas. All forms are transmitted as autosomal dominant traits.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

ne·o·pla·si·a

(nē'ō-plā'zē-ă),
The pathologic process that results in the formation and growth of a neoplasm.
[neo- + G. plasis, a molding]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

neoplasia

(nē′ō-plā′zhə)
n.
1. Formation of new tissue.
2. Formation of a neoplasm or neoplasms.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

neoplasia

 Oncology Abnormal and uncontrolled cell growth. See Anal intraepithelial neoplasia, Cervical intraepithelial neoplasia, Ductal intraepithelial neoplasia, Hereditary neoplasia, Hereditary preneoplasia, Papillary neoplasia, Prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia, Vulvar intraepithelial neoplasia.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

ne·o·pla·si·a

(nē'ō-plā'zē-ă)
The pathologic process that results in the formation and growth of a neoplasm.
[neo- + G. plasis, a molding]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

neoplasia

The process of tumour formation.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

Neoplasia

Abnormal growth of cells, which may lead to a neoplasm, or tumor.
Mentioned in: Pap Test
Gale Encyclopedia of Medicine. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

ne·o·pla·si·a

(nē'ō-plā'zē-ă)
The pathologic process that results in formation and growth of a neoplasm.
[neo- + G. plasis, a molding]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012

Patient discussion about neoplasia

Q. What is a brain tumor?

A. A brain tumour is any intracranial tumor normally either in the brain itself in the cranial nerves, in the brain envelopes, skull, pituitary and pineal gland, or spread from cancers primarily located in other organs (metastatic tumors). It is created by abnormal and uncontrolled cell division. Primary (true) brain tumors (which start in the brain) are commonly located in the posterior cranial fossa in children and in the anterior two-thirds of the cerebral hemispheres in adults, although they can affect any part of the brain.

Q. Is this a tumor? I felt a lump in my breast a few days ago in the shower. Is this a Tumor? Help! I'm scared.

A. If you felt a lump in your breast then you should go see your Doctor to check whether or not it is something that could be dangerous.

Q. what is carcinoid tumors? I had my appendix removed and the doctor came in the room very shocked and said it was full of carcinoid tumors. Im scared to get them somewhere else.

A. ya I have pain all the time but the doctors wont give me anything cuz im so young they don't want me hooked on anything. thank you sooo much for being so kind.

More discussions about neoplasia
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References in periodicals archive ?
Caption: Figure 3: By immunohistochemistry, the neoplastic cells expressed strongly pancytokeratin with frequent paranuclear accentuation in the rhabdoid inclusions (a).
Univariate analysis (Table 2) showed a significant association between the expression of PD-L1 in [greater than or equal to] 25% of neoplastic cells and pCR (p = 0.02).
The statistical analysis showed that expression of vimentin is associated with poor histological differentiation independently of the percentage of positive neoplastic cells.
Recent studies have demonstrated intact E-Cadherin expression in the neoplastic cells, suggesting that these are actually representing a variant of ductal carcinoma with lobular growth patterns.
However, a better basic knowledge of the biological mechanisms underlying selective homing of neoplastic cells to the leptomeninges, together with strict monitoring of the risk/benefit ratio [20, 21], will be needed before routine adoption of these approaches becomes a standard of care.
In mussels with disseminated neoplasia, neoplastic cells were larger (12.62 [+ or -] 1.73 Jam in length, n = 50), and varied in appearance from round to ovoid or spindle shaped.
Our data showed that in all cases where higher number (more than 1%) of neoplastic cells exhibited class III [beta]-tubulin expression, this was detected by both TU-20 and TuJ-1.
An immersion objective was used to count NORs present in 30 nuclei of randomly chosen neoplastic cells. Only those NORs that were individualized with black or brown dots were counted.
Another diagnostic challenge is presence of a heavy inflammatory infiltrate that obscures the neoplastic cells (Figure 4).
The neoplasm was composed of islands and trabeculae of neoplastic cells embedded in abundant loose fibrovascular stroma.
A subsequent round of immunohistochemistry (see Table 1 for antibody information) demonstrated that the neoplastic cells were positive for LCA (Figure 2(d)), CD20, PAX5/BSAP (Figure 2(e)), BCL6, and BCL2 (focal) and negative for CD3 and CD5 (Figure 2(f)).
(Calgary, Canada) has been granted United States Patent 7,198,783 entitled "Sensitization of Neoplastic Cells toRadiation Therapy with Reovirus." The claims describe a method of usingreovirus to sensitize Ras-activated cancer cells that are resistant toradiation therapy."This broad patent represents comprehensive co-therapy coverage of reovirusin combination with radiation and is an important piece of intellectualproperty that supports our ongoing Phase II clinical program with thiscombination," said Dr.