neonatal withdrawal syndrome

neonatal withdrawal syndrome

Neonatal abstinence syndrome Neurology A condition affecting infants of mothers who chronically used CNS-active substances during pregnancy, for which the infant developed an in utero tolerance and who, on delivery, undergoes withdrawal Agents Opioids–eg, heroin, methadone, meperidine, codeine, pentazocine, propoxyphene, crack cocaine, alcohol, clomipramine, sedative-hypnotics–
eg, barbiturates, meprobamate, benzodiazepines Clinical Wakefulness, irritability, seizures, tremulousness, lability of temperature, tachypnea, hyperacusis, hyperreflexia, hypertonicity, diarrhea, sweating, respiratory distress and apnea, rhinorrhea, autonomic dysfunction, respiratory alkalosis, lacrimation, yawning, sneezing; Sx appear 12 h to 1 wk after birth Treatment Swaddling–firmly wrapping in blankets, ↓ external stimuli, tincture of opium. See Crack babies.
References in periodicals archive ?
Pharmacologic observations on the neonatal withdrawal syndrome.
The Food and Drug Administration and Canadian authorities responded to reports of neonatal withdrawal syndrome with suggestions that physicians may consider tapering these antidepressants during the third trimester, which is included in the U.
Reports of symptoms consistent with neonatal withdrawal syndrome and associated with maternal use of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) and selective norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs) prompted the FDA last year to require labeling changes warning of the risk associated with their use during pregnancy.
A Food and Drug Administration advisory panel supported the addition of information to the professional label and patient package insert of serotonin reuptake inhibitors concerning neonatal withdrawal syndrome and toxicity reports in newborns exposed to the drugs during the third trimester.
There is a wide consensus among psychiatrists and experts in our field that stopping treatment late in pregnancy is not necessarily the ideal approach and that women with depression responsive to SSRIs or SNRIs should be properly treated, especially since the neonatal withdrawal syndrome is self limited.
Possible cases of neonatal withdrawal syndrome have been reported with all SSRIs, but in at least one study, the majority of cases were associated with paroxetine.
The perinatal events included four congential malformations, four infants with possible neonatal withdrawal syndrome, two with developmental abnormalities, and two premature births.
Possible cases of neonatal withdrawal syndrome have been reported with use of all SSRIs, but in at least one study, the majority of cases were associated with paroxetine.
As of November 2003, 93 suspected cases of SSRI-associated neonatal withdrawal syndrome had been reported.
Most suspected SSRI-induced neonatal withdrawal syndromes have been associated with paroxetine, although all SSRIs appear be associated with some risk.