neonatal hyperbilirubinemia


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ne·o·na·tal hy·per·bil·i·ru·bi·ne·mi·a

serum bilirubin exceeding 12.9 mg/dL (220 μol/L) or rising at a rate greater than 5 mg/dL per day; also applied to a nonphysiologic pattern of hyperbilirubinemia, that is, jaundice in the first 24 hours of life or extending beyond the first week of life in term infants.

ne·o·na·tal hy·per·bi·li·ru·bi·ne·mi·a

(nē'ō-nā'tăl hī'pĕr-bil'i-rū-bi-nē'mē-ă)
Serum bilirubin greater than 12.9 mg/dL (220 mcmol/L) or rising at a rate greater than 5 mg/dL per day; also applied to a nonphysiologic pattern of hyperbilirubinemia, i.e., jaundice in the first 24 hours of life or extending beyond the first week of life in term infants.
References in periodicals archive ?
Incidence of Neonatal Hyperbilirubinemia with Respect to Birth Weight Weight (KG) Gender Total (%) Male Female LBW (<2.5 Kgs.) 11 (19.6%) 12 (27.2%) 23 (23%) Normal 45 (80.4%) 32 (72.8%) 77 (77%) Total 56 44 100 Table 2.
Risk factors for severe neonatal hyperbilirubinemia in low and middle-income countries: a systematic review and meta-analysis.
Education of primary health care workers about the dangers, signs, and management of neonatal hyperbilirubinemia is also essential [7].
Increased incidence of neonatal hyperbilirubinemia in preterm and low birth weight babies can be explained on the basis of hepatic immaturity, increased bilirubin load, decreased synthesis of ligandin (Y protein) and decreased UDPG (T) activity.
Stevenson, "Drug therapy: neonatal hyperbilirubinemia," The New England Journal of Medicine, vol.
This review offers a perspective on neonatal jaundice by examining bilirubin metabolism, bilirubin neurotoxicity, the management of neonatal hyperbilirubinemia, and methods for the clinical assessment of neonatal jaundice.
An American Academy of Pediatrics subcommittee is revising its guidelines on neonatal hyperbilirubinemia in light of continuing reports of clinically significant but preventable neonatal jaundice and kernicterus.
Hospital readmission due to neonatal hyperbilirubinemia. Pediatrics 1995;96:727-9.
The new treatment, which he calls an important "first step" toward fulfilling that dream, "...represents a promising and new approach to the prevention of neonatal hyperbilirubinemia."
Meanwhile neonatal hyperbilirubinemia might be a serious concern in premature neonates with delayed cord clamping, [25] and in our study we also observed a trend of higher bilirubin levels in DCC group, but this difference was not statistically significant.

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