neonatal hepatitis


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ne·o·na·tal hep·a·ti·tis

hepatitis in the neonatal period presumed to be due to any of a variety of causes, chiefly viral; characterized by direct and indirect bilirubinemia, hepatocellular degeneration, and appearance of multinucleated giant cells; may be difficult to distinguish from biliary atresia, but is more likely to end with recovery, although cirrhosis may develop.

neonatal hepatitis

hepatitis of unknown cause with onset in the first few weeks of life. Some cases are associated with viral or bacterial infection; a few are familial. It is characterized by the transformation of hepatocytes into polynuclear giant cells and by conjugated hyperbilirubinemia with jaundice. Most patients recover completely; some develop chronic disease or fatal cirrhosis. Also called giant cell hepatitis.

neonatal 'hepatitis'

A generic term for diseases of the newborn hepatic parenchyma, commonly associated with ↑ conjugated hyperbilirubinemia Diagnosis Requires ≥ 3 of following: fatty changes, cholestasis, bile duct proliferation, fibrosis, pseudoacini, cirrhosis Etiology Infection–syphilis, listeriosis, HBV, rubella, CMV, echovirus, adenovirus, toxoplasmosis, metabolic disease–α1-antitrypsin deficiency, cystic fibrosis, Wilson's disease, galactosemia, fructosuria, tyrosinemia, mechanical–choledochal cysts, intrahepatic ductal atresia hypoplasia, familial intrahepatic cholestasis, HDN, etc. See Hemolytic disease of the newborn. Cf Giant cell hepatitis.

ne·o·na·tal hep·a·ti·tis

(nē'ō-nā'tăl hep'ă-tī'tis)
The disorder in the neonatal period attributable to a variety of causes, chiefly viral.

ne·o·na·tal hep·a·ti·tis

(nē'ō-nā'tăl hep'ă-tī'tis)
Neonatal disorder due to chiefly viral pathogens.
References in periodicals archive ?
In one of the largest series on paediatric liver biopsies from Pakistan, the most common aetiology was neonatal hepatitis and was seen in 20.
Clinical and laboratory features of neonatal hepatitis of different etiology.
AST was significantly higher in the neonatal hepatitis group than in the other two groups (p<0.
The two most common causes of neonatal cholestasis are biliary atresia and idiopathic neonatal hepatitis.
and a Th1-type cytokine profile (expression of interleukin [IL] 2, interferon [gamma], tumor necrosis factor a, and IL-12) in cases of biliary atresia in contrast to normal liver controls and other neonatal cholestatic liver diseases, such as idiopathic neonatal hepatitis, total parenteral nutrition-associated liver disease, and choledochal cysts; these findings suggest that the inflammatory infiltrate seen in biliary atresia is a specific immune response rather than a secondary phenomenon of cholestatic diseases.
Neonatal hepatitis was diagnosed in a similar incidence as with Ahmed et al2, and Monajemzadeh et al.
In addition, among 832 infants identified by a neonatal hepatitis B surveillance and vaccination program in New York City in 1988, only 59% had received HBIG and completed the vaccine series by age 18 months (9 ).
Any young child who presents with yellow skin, poor growth and abnormal blood tests along with other clinical features has been said to have neonatal hepatitis.
Transmission of hepatitis B virus (HBV) from an asymptomatic chronic carrier mother to her newborn infant has been shown to result in acute neonatal hepatitis and in long-term serious liver disease.
of cases Percentage Physiological 22 22 Septicemia 18 18 Rh-Isoimmunization 13 13 Jaundice of Prematurity 13 13 ABO Isoimmunization 6 6 Jaundice in small for age babies 6 6 Polycythemia 4 4 Intrauterine infections 3 3 Neonatal Hepatitis 2.
Significance and anamnestic response in isolated hepatitis B core antibody- positive individuals 18 years after neonatal hepatitis B virus vaccination in Taiwan.

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