asphyxia

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asphyxia

 [as-fik´se-ah]
pathological changes caused by lack of oxygen in respired air, resulting in a deficiency of oxygen in the blood (hypoxia) and an increase in carbon dioxide in the blood and tissues (hypercapnia). Symptoms include irregular and disturbed respirations, or a complete absence of breathing, and pallor or cyanosis. Asphyxia may occur whenever there is an interruption in the normal exchange of oxygen and carbon dioxide between the lungs and the outside air. Some common causes are drowning, electric shock, hanging, suffocation, lodging of a foreign body in the air passages, inhalation of smoke and poisonous gases, and trauma to or disease of the lungs or air passages. Treatment includes immediate remedy of the situation by artificial respiration and removal of the underlying cause whenever possible. See also suffocation. adj., adj asphyx´�ial, asphyx´iant.

as·phyx·i·a

(as-fik'sē-ă),
Impaired or absent exchange of oxygen and carbon dioxide on a ventilatory basis; combined hypercapnia and hypoxia or anoxia.
[G. a- priv. + sphyzō, to throb]

asphyxia

/as·phyx·ia/ (as-fik´se-ah) pathological changes caused by lack of oxygen in respired air, resulting in hypoxia and hypercapnia.asphyx´ial
fetal asphyxia  asphyxia in utero due to hypoxia.
asphyxia neonato´rum  respiratory failure in the newborn; see also respiratory distress syndrome of newborn, under syndrome.
traumatic asphyxia  that due to sudden or severe compression of the thorax or upper abdomen, or both.

asphyxia

(ăs-fĭk′sē-ə)
n.
A condition in which an extreme decrease in the concentration of oxygen in the body accompanied by an increase in the concentration of carbon dioxide leads to loss of consciousness or death. Asphyxia can be induced by choking, drowning, electric shock, injury, or the inhalation of toxic gases.

asphyxia

[asfik′sē·ə]
Etymology: Gk, a + sphyxis, without pulse
severe hypoxia leading to hypoxemia and hypercapnia, loss of consciousness, and, if not corrected, death. Some of the more common causes of asphyxia are drowning, electrical shock, aspiration of vomitus, lodging of a foreign body in the respiratory tract, inhalation of toxic gas or smoke, and poisoning. Oxygen and artificial ventilation are promptly administered to prevent damage to the brain. The underlying cause is then treated. See also artificial ventilation. asphyxiate, v., asphyxiated, adj.

asphyxia

Physiology
1. Impaired breathing.
2. A pathological state caused by the inadequate intake of O2, with accumulation of CO2 and hypoxia. See Autoerotic asphyxia, Sexual asphyxia.

as·phyx·i·a

(as-fik'sē-ă)
Impairment of ventilatory exchange of oxygen and carbon dioxide; combined hypercapnia, hypoxia, or anoxia; causes death if not corrected.
[G. a- priv. + sphyzō, to throb]

asphyxia

Suffocation by interference with the free AIRWAY between the atmosphere and the air sacs in the lungs. Asphyxia is usually the cause of death in drowning, choking, strangling, inhalation of a gas which excludes oxygen, foreign body airway obstruction and OEDEMA of the LARYNX.

asphyxia

suffocation, lack of oxygen.

Asphyxia

Lack of oxygen. In the case of cerebral palsy, lack of oxygen to the brain.
Mentioned in: Cerebral Palsy

asphyxia

total deprivation of oxygen from any cause, leading to unconsciousness and death if unrelieved; originally from the Greek, meaning absence of a pulse, which rapidly follows total lack of oxygen. Includes obstruction to breathing (e.g. suffocation, strangulation) or depletion of oxygen in the inspired gas. See also apnoea, hypoxia.

asphyxia (as·fiksˑ·ē·),

n obstruction of air flow resulting in hypoxia severe enough to cause unconsciousness, hypercapnia, hypoxemia, and death, if not immediately treated.

as·phyx·i·a

(as-fik'sē-ă)
Impaired or absent exchange of oxygen and carbon dioxide on a ventilatory basis; combined hypercapnia and hypoxia or anoxia.
[G. a- priv. + sphyzō, to throb]

asphyxia (asfik´sēə),

n a condition of suffocation resulting from restriction of oxygen intake and interference with the elimination of carbon dioxide.

asphyxia

a condition due to lack of oxygen in inspired air, resulting in actual or impending cessation of apparent life. It includes lack of air to respire. See also suffocation.

neonatal asphyxia
the fetus is deprived of air while on the birth canal and appears to have died during birth. Stimulation of respiratory movements and artificial respiration may cause respiration to resume.
References in periodicals archive ?
05), indicating that the efficacy of the observation group on neonatal asphyxia is superior to that of the control group.
Cardiac dysfunction in an animal model of neonatal asphyxia is associated with increased degradation of MLC1 by MMP-2.
In addition, the rate of fetal distress and neonatal asphyxia were higher in the control group, but there was no significant difference between the two groups (p>0.
INTRODUCTION: Perinatal asphyxia, neonatal asphyxia or birth asphyxia is a medical condition resulting from deprivation of oxygen to a newborn infant that lasts long enough during the process to cause physical harm, usually to the brain.
Neonatal asphyxia is considered the predominant etiology in both premature and full term neonates.
Neonates who were at risk of hypocalcaemia such as neonatal asphyxia, respiratory distress, sepsis, infant of diabetic mother and maternal consumption of anticonvulsant were excluded.
10 Although some studies have indicated that there was correlation between chronic neonatal asphyxia and meconium spillage, Simsek and collegues' study (2008) revealed no correlation.
Neonates receiving phototherapy, neonates with Apgar of less than 7 at 5 minutes of birth, babies suffering from neonatal asphyxia, severe respiratory distress and those receiving total parenteral nutrition, calcium supplementation, intravenous fluids and blood transfusion were excluded from the study.

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