neologism

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neologism

 [ne-ol´o-jizm]
a newly coined word; in psychiatry, a word whose meaning may be known only to the patient using it; see also word salad.

ne·ol·o·gism

(nē-ol'ō-jizm),
A new word or phrase of the patient's own making often seen in schizophrenia (for example, headshoe to mean hat), or an existing word used in a new sense; in psychiatry, such usages may have meaning only to the patient or be indicative of the patient's condition.
[neo- + G. logos, word]

neologism

/ne·ol·o·gism/ (ne-ol´ah-jizm) a newly coined word; in psychiatry, a new word whose meaning may be known only to the patient using it.

neologism

(nē-ŏl′ə-jĭz′əm)
n.
1. A new word, expression, or usage.
2. Psychology
a. The invention of new words regarded as a symptom of certain psychotic disorders, such as schizophrenia.
b. A word so invented.

ne·ol′o·gist n.
ne·ol′o·gis′tic, ne·ol′o·gis′ti·cal adj.

neologism

[nē·ol′əjiz′əm]
Etymology: Gk, neos + logos, word
1 a word or term newly coined or used with a new meaning.
2 (in psychiatry) a word coined by a psychotic or delirious patient that is meaningful only to the patient.

neologism

Neurology/psychiatry A word created by a Pt with a mental disorder or dementia, which includes new usages for standard words and ad hoc substitutes for names forgotten by a Pt; neologisms are created by Pts with schizophrenia and organic mental disorders

ne·ol·o·gism

(nē-ol'ŏ-jizm)
A new word or phrase of the patient's own making often seen in schizophrenia (e.g., headshoe to mean hat), or an existing word used in a new sense; in psychiatry, such usages may have meaning only to the patient or be indicative of the underlying condition.
[neo- + G. logos, word]

neologism

1. A newly coined word or phrase.
2. A meaningless word used by a psychotic person.
References in periodicals archive ?
This dictionary is one of the biggest achievements of Mordvin lexicography, not only for the great deal of information it contains, but also because of Damaskin's neologistic work that significantly contributed to the reform of the Mordvin literary standard language and to the improvement of its vocabulary.
If indeed wordplay were to be offered as a consideration here, a chapter on the works of Rabelais would certainly take precedence over Joyce, though countless earlier works in English alone, including Beowulf, are also full of paronomasia, neologistic or otherwise.
E]ven the most shabby stores are emblazoned with neologistic sect names, signs listing the order of services, and posters listing references to biblical passages.
Indeed, lawfare suggested, in its neologistic form, something beyond the determinate law-war framework.
Meanwhile, as Russell Jacoby saw it, several discouraging trends emerged among (self-defined) 'radical' intellectuals: among them, perpetual abstract theory theorising about abstract theory; esotericism and indecipherable, neologistic prose justified for its purported subversive qualities; and most lamentable, a flight to technocratic amelioration and away from bolder emancipatory political vision.
Her sentences contained a lot of stop-and-go; they thought out loud, they broke into confidential dramatic asides, and they took seemingly wrong turns into neologistic diction.
Uxor sounds like Egyptian Luxor, or Hypoluxo, Florida's neologistic stab at a resort.
According to Ugo Cerletti, a professor of neuropsychiatry at the University of Rome who is credited with conceiving the method by which ECT is given today, the man was "delusional, hallucinating and gesticulating and alternated between periods of mutism and incomprehensible, neologistic speech".