neologism

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neologism

 [ne-ol´o-jizm]
a newly coined word; in psychiatry, a word whose meaning may be known only to the patient using it; see also word salad.

ne·ol·o·gism

(nē-ol'ō-jizm),
A new word or phrase of the patient's own making often seen in schizophrenia (for example, headshoe to mean hat), or an existing word used in a new sense; in psychiatry, such usages may have meaning only to the patient or be indicative of the patient's condition.
[neo- + G. logos, word]

neologism

/ne·ol·o·gism/ (ne-ol´ah-jizm) a newly coined word; in psychiatry, a new word whose meaning may be known only to the patient using it.

neologism

(nē-ŏl′ə-jĭz′əm)
n.
1. A new word, expression, or usage.
2. Psychology
a. The invention of new words regarded as a symptom of certain psychotic disorders, such as schizophrenia.
b. A word so invented.

ne·ol′o·gist n.
ne·ol′o·gis′tic, ne·ol′o·gis′ti·cal adj.

neologism

[nē·ol′əjiz′əm]
Etymology: Gk, neos + logos, word
1 a word or term newly coined or used with a new meaning.
2 (in psychiatry) a word coined by a psychotic or delirious patient that is meaningful only to the patient.

neologism

Neurology/psychiatry A word created by a Pt with a mental disorder or dementia, which includes new usages for standard words and ad hoc substitutes for names forgotten by a Pt; neologisms are created by Pts with schizophrenia and organic mental disorders

ne·ol·o·gism

(nē-ol'ŏ-jizm)
A new word or phrase of the patient's own making often seen in schizophrenia (e.g., headshoe to mean hat), or an existing word used in a new sense; in psychiatry, such usages may have meaning only to the patient or be indicative of the underlying condition.
[neo- + G. logos, word]

neologism

1. A newly coined word or phrase.
2. A meaningless word used by a psychotic person.
References in periodicals archive ?
This section presents those cases and shows that they are in fact lexically deviant, that is, either archaic or neologistic, and can be excepted without resorting to ad hoc mechanisms.
Consider Tiger Woods, whose neologistic self-description refers to the fact that he is part white, part black, part American Indian, part Thai, and part Chinese.
As before, the material seems to be derivative, the writer generalizes about Thucydides, use of diphthongs when he should be specific about his spelling of [Greek Words Omitted], and mentions neither Thucydides, use of Ionic for nor his neologistic abstract nouns ending in -[Mu]a.
viii) through the use of neologistic phrases (and the concepts underlying them) like "pluralistic historicism" and "the fallacy of parallel developments.
12 This last term, "semiosis" (sometimes "semeiosis" or "semeiosy"), is Peirce's own neologistic adaptation of the Greek term [Greek Text Omitted], which occurs at least thirty times in the Herculanean papyrus On Signs authored in the first century by Philodemus; see Philodemus, On Methods of Inference (c.
Some are provoked into their own neologistic use of popular combining forms in articulating their scepticism: 'The 1980s were the salad days for bizspeak .
The style of the book is famous among philologists for its neologistic doublets--"diuulgate or set forth," "animate or give courage," "ensignment or teaching"--the traces of a mind insecurely poised between competing discourses of intellectual authority.
Sustained neologistic paronomasia is one of Lem's fundamental ways of investigating the unknown and estranging the familiar, especially when his own fiction is the subject of such investigation and estrangement.
Who else cohabits so comfortably with the neologistic and the defamiliarizing, with a rhetoricity half so heightened, as these odor-eaters in the pump-up Nikes of the cybernauts?
It is under the pressure of this dilemma that Derrida is attempting, according to Rorty, to theorize about the philosophical tradition while cancelling the theoretical import of his claims and denying that his words and concepts, neologistic though they may be, are in fact words and concepts which can be put to theoretical use.
Nevada Diggs answer this question by climbing over it: rather than trying to cop a "singular voice," both poets go in for neologistic, sound-driven avalanches to portray a patriarchal world on overdrive.