neologism

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neologism

 [ne-ol´o-jizm]
a newly coined word; in psychiatry, a word whose meaning may be known only to the patient using it; see also word salad.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

ne·ol·o·gism

(nē-ol'ō-jizm),
A new word or phrase of the patient's own making often seen in schizophrenia (for example, headshoe to mean hat), or an existing word used in a new sense; in psychiatry, such usages may have meaning only to the patient or be indicative of the patient's condition.
[neo- + G. logos, word]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

neologism

(nē-ŏl′ə-jĭz′əm)
n.
1. A new word, expression, or usage.
2. Psychology
a. The invention of new words regarded as a symptom of certain psychotic disorders, such as schizophrenia.
b. A word so invented.

ne·ol′o·gist n.
ne·ol′o·gis′tic, ne·ol′o·gis′ti·cal adj.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

neologism

Neurology/psychiatry A word created by a Pt with a mental disorder or dementia, which includes new usages for standard words and ad hoc substitutes for names forgotten by a Pt; neologisms are created by Pts with schizophrenia and organic mental disorders
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

ne·ol·o·gism

(nē-ol'ŏ-jizm)
A new word or phrase of the patient's own making often seen in schizophrenia (e.g., headshoe to mean hat), or an existing word used in a new sense; in psychiatry, such usages may have meaning only to the patient or be indicative of the underlying condition.
[neo- + G. logos, word]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

neologism

1. A newly coined word or phrase.
2. A meaningless word used by a psychotic person.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
This section presents those cases and shows that they are in fact lexically deviant, that is, either archaic or neologistic, and can be excepted without resorting to ad hoc mechanisms.
(134) Some courts have turned this investigative practice into a neologistic rationale for fingerprinting.
At the same time he has woven through it, a high level of explanatory analysis, mercifully unencumbered by dubious theory or neologistic abstractions.
After the Romantic authors (such as Jose de Alencar), modernist writers in particular were the ones responsible for its resurgence, thus differentiating themselves from Portuga, underlining the specific features of standard Brazilian, and claiming a lexis and a syntax sui generis, faulty and neologistic though these may have been.
Ironically, by using this kind of neologistic vocabulary and syntax, the introduction, for example, creates just the sort of elite tradition, in which only initiates can participate in a circle of understanding that it is setting out to investigate.
neologistic compounds, and syntax highly compressed for metrical and
Richard Kostelanetz criticizes Hoover's Postmodern American Poetry for excluding what he considers a whole range of avant-garde work that might also have forced rethinking of the anthology's nature: "It completely omits sound poetry, visual poetry, neologistic poems, minimal poems, site-specific poems, video poetry, poetry holograms, computer poetry, and comparable experimental forms" (1995, 17).
Consider Tiger Woods, whose neologistic self-description refers to the fact that he is part white, part black, part American Indian, part Thai, and part Chinese.
As before, the material seems to be derivative, the writer generalizes about Thucydides, use of diphthongs when he should be specific about his spelling of [Greek Words Omitted], and mentions neither Thucydides, use of Ionic for nor his neologistic abstract nouns ending in -[Mu]a.
viii) through the use of neologistic phrases (and the concepts underlying them) like "pluralistic historicism" and "the fallacy of parallel developments." He also identifies various "rhetorics" (of deceit, of geniality) and taxonomic terms (such as the Cosmopolitan Ideal) and types (the False Misanthropist, the False Genialist, and the Genial Misanthrope).