neologism


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neologism

 [ne-ol´o-jizm]
a newly coined word; in psychiatry, a word whose meaning may be known only to the patient using it; see also word salad.

ne·ol·o·gism

(nē-ol'ō-jizm),
A new word or phrase of the patient's own making often seen in schizophrenia (for example, headshoe to mean hat), or an existing word used in a new sense; in psychiatry, such usages may have meaning only to the patient or be indicative of the patient's condition.
[neo- + G. logos, word]

neologism

/ne·ol·o·gism/ (ne-ol´ah-jizm) a newly coined word; in psychiatry, a new word whose meaning may be known only to the patient using it.

neologism

(nē-ŏl′ə-jĭz′əm)
n.
1. A new word, expression, or usage.
2. Psychology
a. The invention of new words regarded as a symptom of certain psychotic disorders, such as schizophrenia.
b. A word so invented.

ne·ol′o·gist n.
ne·ol′o·gis′tic, ne·ol′o·gis′ti·cal adj.

neologism

[nē·ol′əjiz′əm]
Etymology: Gk, neos + logos, word
1 a word or term newly coined or used with a new meaning.
2 (in psychiatry) a word coined by a psychotic or delirious patient that is meaningful only to the patient.

neologism

Neurology/psychiatry A word created by a Pt with a mental disorder or dementia, which includes new usages for standard words and ad hoc substitutes for names forgotten by a Pt; neologisms are created by Pts with schizophrenia and organic mental disorders

ne·ol·o·gism

(nē-ol'ŏ-jizm)
A new word or phrase of the patient's own making often seen in schizophrenia (e.g., headshoe to mean hat), or an existing word used in a new sense; in psychiatry, such usages may have meaning only to the patient or be indicative of the underlying condition.
[neo- + G. logos, word]

neologism

1. A newly coined word or phrase.
2. A meaningless word used by a psychotic person.
References in periodicals archive ?
For the new words' acceptance, a vital language and motivated speakers are required, and as we know, the road is long to a complete acceptance of neologisms by any community, even in optimal circumstances.
Ezekiel's use of seven hapax legomena and numerous neologisms therein serves to highlight the magnitude of the catastrophe that awaited Tyre on the eve of its anticipated destruction by Babylon.
so, in fact the term lex ludica is a neologism of modern times, like lex sportiva
The new term is labelled as neologism by necessity.
As a result, this neologism should become "JIIM-C" (pronounced "gym-see"), referring to our continued integration of and interdependence with industry in military logistics.
From what the OED (questionably) identifies as the first use of "coin" in this sense, in George Puttenham's Arte of English Poesie, the discomfort surrounding neologism accompanies unease about social mobility:
De Mauro seeks to rescue neologism from any status of a facile cinderella, declaring it to be of no less fundamental importance in linguistic development than phonology or morphology and therefore needing to be studied and understood just as thoroughly and seriously.
Gillis does not explicitly take up her "cyberpunked" neologism vis-a-vis the Matrix, but she does provide an interesting reading of the femme fatale in noir cinema and the noir elements of The Matrix trilogy.
The ephemeral popularity of some new words on the other hand is mostly due to the decline of interest for the concrete object or notion that a particular neologism denotes.
At the time, the word "realtor" didn't exist; in just one example of its efforts to establish a new, respectable profession, NAREB adopted the neologism in 1916 to distinguish its members from run-of-the-mill brokers: "We ought to insist that folks call us 'realtors' and not 'real-estate men," Babbitt tells a fellow broker.
With "-itis" as the medical suffix for inflammation, "exceptionitis," a convenient neologism, might be defined as an inflammatory process in the decision-making locus in the underwriter's cerebral cortex.