neologism


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neologism

 [ne-ol´o-jizm]
a newly coined word; in psychiatry, a word whose meaning may be known only to the patient using it; see also word salad.

ne·ol·o·gism

(nē-ol'ō-jizm),
A new word or phrase of the patient's own making often seen in schizophrenia (for example, headshoe to mean hat), or an existing word used in a new sense; in psychiatry, such usages may have meaning only to the patient or be indicative of the patient's condition.
[neo- + G. logos, word]

neologism

(nē-ŏl′ə-jĭz′əm)
n.
1. A new word, expression, or usage.
2. Psychology
a. The invention of new words regarded as a symptom of certain psychotic disorders, such as schizophrenia.
b. A word so invented.

ne·ol′o·gist n.
ne·ol′o·gis′tic, ne·ol′o·gis′ti·cal adj.

neologism

Neurology/psychiatry A word created by a Pt with a mental disorder or dementia, which includes new usages for standard words and ad hoc substitutes for names forgotten by a Pt; neologisms are created by Pts with schizophrenia and organic mental disorders

ne·ol·o·gism

(nē-ol'ŏ-jizm)
A new word or phrase of the patient's own making often seen in schizophrenia (e.g., headshoe to mean hat), or an existing word used in a new sense; in psychiatry, such usages may have meaning only to the patient or be indicative of the underlying condition.
[neo- + G. logos, word]

neologism

1. A newly coined word or phrase.
2. A meaningless word used by a psychotic person.
References in periodicals archive ?
Ezekiel's use of seven hapax legomena and numerous neologisms therein serves to highlight the magnitude of the catastrophe that awaited Tyre on the eve of its anticipated destruction by Babylon.
The semantic novelty status of each new term was checked by reference to the dictionaries of neologisms of the Romanian language (MDN, DCR3).
The new term is labelled as neologism by necessity.
As a result, this neologism should become "JIIM-C" (pronounced "gym-see"), referring to our continued integration of and interdependence with industry in military logistics.
From what the OED (questionably) identifies as the first use of "coin" in this sense, in George Puttenham's Arte of English Poesie, the discomfort surrounding neologism accompanies unease about social mobility:
Four major themes emerge from the seven chapters: (1) the function of neologisms, that is how and why they arise and take the different forms they do; (2) why (as in the volume's title) some neologisms succeed and others fail; (3) discussion of some of the most recent coinings and new usages in the Romance languages, especially Italian and Spanish; (4) attitudes towards neologisms both historically and currently, with some special emphasis on the work of Panzini.
It is also important to note that under the section Kritisches und Normatives within a number of entries included in the dictionary Neuer Wortschatz (7) the reader can find the information that a certain neologism has been chosen among the words of the year in Der Sprachdienst.
With a neologism worthy of the rimailleurs, Rigolot describes the revived interest in these figures since the 1970s as a process of "rhehabilitation" (84).
At the risk of coining a fourth type (writers are only allowed one neologism per article) we could say that the global economy (and its attendant pollution) is itself 4th nature.
"Digi-crimes" is the vile neologism stamped on what is fast becoming an unexplored legal arena.
However, one thing bothers me--I don't like the neologism lifestance, which is used twice on the page.