neologism


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neologism

 [ne-ol´o-jizm]
a newly coined word; in psychiatry, a word whose meaning may be known only to the patient using it; see also word salad.

ne·ol·o·gism

(nē-ol'ō-jizm),
A new word or phrase of the patient's own making often seen in schizophrenia (for example, headshoe to mean hat), or an existing word used in a new sense; in psychiatry, such usages may have meaning only to the patient or be indicative of the patient's condition.
[neo- + G. logos, word]

neologism

/ne·ol·o·gism/ (ne-ol´ah-jizm) a newly coined word; in psychiatry, a new word whose meaning may be known only to the patient using it.

neologism

(nē-ŏl′ə-jĭz′əm)
n.
1. A new word, expression, or usage.
2. Psychology
a. The invention of new words regarded as a symptom of certain psychotic disorders, such as schizophrenia.
b. A word so invented.

ne·ol′o·gist n.
ne·ol′o·gis′tic, ne·ol′o·gis′ti·cal adj.

neologism

[nē·ol′əjiz′əm]
Etymology: Gk, neos + logos, word
1 a word or term newly coined or used with a new meaning.
2 (in psychiatry) a word coined by a psychotic or delirious patient that is meaningful only to the patient.

neologism

Neurology/psychiatry A word created by a Pt with a mental disorder or dementia, which includes new usages for standard words and ad hoc substitutes for names forgotten by a Pt; neologisms are created by Pts with schizophrenia and organic mental disorders

ne·ol·o·gism

(nē-ol'ŏ-jizm)
A new word or phrase of the patient's own making often seen in schizophrenia (e.g., headshoe to mean hat), or an existing word used in a new sense; in psychiatry, such usages may have meaning only to the patient or be indicative of the underlying condition.
[neo- + G. logos, word]

neologism

1. A newly coined word or phrase.
2. A meaningless word used by a psychotic person.
References in periodicals archive ?
The words and syntax of the soldier come from the higher register of Afrikaans and contain a neologism 'honderdman', literally 'hundredman', Louw's invention for a centurion.
Paired with each poem and neologism is an individual image of art, ranging from Renoir to ancient sculpture, each designed to match thematically.
This inflammatory status, which has been referred to by the neologism "inflammaging", is of sufficient magnitude to impact health and survival time, and correlates with age-related diseases such as atherosclerosis, insulin resistance and Alzheimer's disease.
The Arab Spring (or with the latest neologism, the Arab Awakening) changed the reactionary dynamics of Arab politics.
on a finite level, [existing] as a reality essence (a metareality) involving a persuasive consciousness (information expressed through meaning as metaconsciousness) and order (ordropy [another neologism, M.
If a child is given a neologism or a name common to boys and girls, he or she is likely to have a lifetime of misaddressed envelopes, unnecessary hassles and other tiresome or embarrassing gender-confused situations.
The bigger deal however was that Sude Khanian, an Iranian artist from Dubai, got to display her unconventional technique EoACAyVaguesm', a neologism in art terminology.
A REGULAR and erudite reader (that's different from Araldite by the way although he has stuck by me for years) has sent a list of winning entries from The Washington Post's neologism contest.
the phenomenon demonstrated by leading spokeswomen of any religion can be explained in terms of the neologism "dianomy"--that is, "an accounting of moral agency that does not rely exclusively on either the self or religious traditions as the source of moral authority" (185).
In case you're wondering, "soulistry" is a neologism coined by We Rev.
How does one translate, into a language with no equivalent formality, a witty neologism for the continued use of the formal vous after one feels the familiar tu has been earned?
3) The neologism 'lex sportiva' is not a pure Latinism, since the adjective 'sportiva' is not Latin, the term 'lex sportiva' obviously was created by analogy with the medieval lex mercatoria (merchant law).