neocytolysis

ne·o·cy·tol·y·sis

(nē'ō-sī-tol'i-sis),
Physiologic process in which immature erythrocytes are selectively hemolyzed, resulting in adaptation to a new environment in which erythrocyte mass is excessive; discovered in studies of patients with space-flight-related anemia.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012
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Angel de Francisco and colleagues (2009) have divided these into patient factors/comorbidities (chronic inflammation, secondary hyperparathyroidism, iron status, nutritional status, hematological disorders, and red blood cell lifespan), intercurrent events (infection, acute inflammation, hospitalization, bleeding/hemolysis, pure red cell aplasia [PRCA], medications, interdialytic weight gain, neocytolysis), and practice procedures (dialysis modality, hemoglobin sampling, hemoglobin assay variability, dialysis adequacy, and anemia management protocol).
The loss of red blood cell mass is due to a physiological process called neocytolysis, in which immature blood cells are selectively hemolyzed because of reductions in the plasma erythropoietin levels (48), (49).
(47.) Rice L, Alfrey CR The negative regulation of red cell mass by neocytolysis: physiologic and pathophysiologic manifestations.
suggested a role for neocytolysis which may destroy newly formed erythrocytes when erythropoietin levels decrease below critical thresholds.
In keeping with this conclusion is the process occurring upon transition of lowlanders from hypoxia to normoxia (for instance, mountain climbers returning to sea level after high altitude acclimatization), which consists of a decrease of EPO plasma level and a fast reduction of erythrocyte mass through neocytolysis, i.e.
Neocytolysis has been observed in healthy subjects after return from high altitude to sea level and is involved also in anemias associated to reduced production of EPO, for instance in renal diseases.
In subjects exposed to conditions triggering neocytolysis, beside the dramatic reduction of young RBCs counts, changes in neocytes membrane components have been observed contributing to a "senescent-like" phenotype and likely targeting them to macrophage phagocytosis.
Neocytolysis has been observed in healthy subjects after return from high altitude to sea level and has been shown to occur also in astronauts (8-10).
Neocytolysis is involved also in anemias associated to reduced production of EPO, for instance in renal diseases (11).
In subjects exposed to conditions triggering neocytolysis, beside the dramatic reduction of young red cells counts, changes in neocytes membrane components have been observed, and that contributes to a "senescent-like" phenotype and likely targets them to macrophage phagocytosis (10).
3) And does EPO's decrease, occurring during deacclimatisation, the main cause triggering neocytolysis, as the abrogation of neocytolysis in vivo by EPO administration seems to suggest (8)?
The authors were keen to invoke increased breakdown of red cells (neocytolysis), which is apparently consistent with the observed rise in plasma ferritin.