neo-shamanism

neo-shamanism

A general term for a modern Western interpretation of the spiritual and medical tradition of shamanism, which draws on the use of rituals and “tribal” psychology for therapy. In addition to the shamanic state of altered consciousness through rituals and psychotherapy, neo-shamanism uses such tools as flotation tanks, strobe lights, active-alert hypnosis and other devices or practices intended to alter a person’s reality sense.
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an inability to lead authentic lives." Eliade, in particular, through his widely read and highly regarded research, created a "new humanism" popularized by New Age adherents as "neo-shamanism" (Kehoe 1996: 377).
Commercial development is also common in different types of New Age rituals, for example neo-shamanism of Native Americans or Ecuadorians performing in modern American context (Johnson, 1995; Aldred, 2000).
Eliade created for these poor souls "anew humanism" readily popularized into New Age "neo-shamanism." His "new humanism" turns out to be a very old primitivism (Lovejoy and Boas 1965[1935]) seducing "transvestites in the cultural domain," to borrow Christian Feest's (1990:327) felicitous phrase for contemporary Europeans who dress in Indian costume.
He then tackles the performances themselves, ranging from body art, ritualism and neo-shamanism to video and multimedia and the rise of the avant-garde in cyberspace.
Neo-Shamanism, Core Shamanism, Urban Shamanism, Modern Shamanism, Modern Shamanism or What ?>>, Spirit Talk 14 : 3-6.
The editors have organized the fifteen selections that make up the main body of the text in four parts devoted to debates on the interaction between New Age and local Latin American cultures; Latin American neo-shamanisms; popular medicines, healing, and new age therapy circuits; and ethnic traditions and New Age.