Neo-Lamarckism

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Neo-Lamarckism

(nē′ō-lə-mär′kĭz′əm)
n.
A theory of the late 1800s and early 1900s, based on Lamarckism, that adaptive characteristics acquired by an organism during its lifetime could be inherited by its offspring.

Ne′o-La·marck′i·an (-mär′kē-ən) adj. & n.
References in periodicals archive ?
It was about applying neo-Lamarckian eugenic ideology in support of the sanitation and hygiene of public spaces and the home.
below, who wed Deweyan pragmatism to neo-Lamarckian sociology in their
Kaplan, Berkson, and Dubnow in favor of a neo-Lamarckian view of
On the other hand, corresponding with the neo-Lamarckian approach, Alchian maintained that firms adopt routines because of what he calls "uncertainty." The root of uncertainty is the insufficiency of information in making a one-to-one correspondence between decision and outcome.
Second, through the identification of the genotype metaphor, it is possible to isolate the difference between neo-Darwinian theory and neo-Lamarckian theory.
He describes how political commitments, linked to biological theory through belief in neo-Lamarckian naturalistic ethics, guided propositional construction of biological theory in one of this century's most important new scientific fields--animal ecology.
(89.) Although Durkheim insisted that he was concerned with the social rather than the biological causes of suicide, he was, nevertheless, influenced by the popular, if sometimes vague, "degeneration" theory, especially its neo-Lamarckian variety.
Neo-Lamarckians, for their part, could not produce empirical proof that an acquired trait could be passed on, nor could they explain a precise mechanism for inheritance.