Neo-Lamarckism

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Neo-Lamarckism

(nē′ō-lə-mär′kĭz′əm)
n.
A theory of the late 1800s and early 1900s, based on Lamarckism, that adaptive characteristics acquired by an organism during its lifetime could be inherited by its offspring.

Ne′o-La·marck′i·an (-mär′kē-ən) adj. & n.
References in periodicals archive ?
23) The physical and moral instruction students received in physical education courses, teachers argued, would help students overcome those negative environmental influences, which could, in neo-Lamarckian logic, otherwise prove corruptive for future generations.
Zava's final suggestion, based on the idea that some "latent" quality of the original mother had been brought out by the "careful education" provided by Herland society, is a neo-Lamarckian argument: culture itself is the force for biosocial hereditary change.
In contrast, the neo-Lamarckian view, which can be also dubbed as "developmentalist," regards the mutation of the gene or family of genes as somewhat directed or influenced by environmental pressures (see Foster, 1991; Sarkar, 1991).
He describes how political commitments, linked to biological theory through belief in neo-Lamarckian naturalistic ethics, guided propositional construction of biological theory in one of this century's most important new scientific fields--animal ecology.
Although Durkheim insisted that he was concerned with the social rather than the biological causes of suicide, he was, nevertheless, influenced by the popular, if sometimes vague, "degeneration" theory, especially its neo-Lamarckian variety.