nematode


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roundworm

 [round´werm]
any member of the class nematoda, somewhat resembling common earthworms in appearance; many are found as parasites in humans or other animals. Those most frequently infecting humans include Ascaris lumbricoides (see ascariasis); Enterobius vermicularis (the pinworm; see enterobiasis); the hookworm (see hookworm disease); the filaria (see filariasis); and the trichina (see trichinosis).

nem·a·tode

(nem'ă-tōd),
A common name for any roundworm of the phylum Nematoda.

nematode

/nem·a·tode/ (nem´ah-tōd) a roundworm; any individual of the class Nematoda.

nematode

(nĕm′ə-tōd′, nē′mə-)
n.
Any of numerous worms of the phylum Nematoda, having unsegmented cylindrical bodies often narrowing at each end, and including free-living species that are abundant in soil and water, and species that are parasites of plants and animals, such as eelworms, pinworms, and hookworms. Also called roundworm.

nem′a·tode′ adj.

nematode

[nem′ətōd]
Etymology: Gk, nema + eidos, form
a multicellular, parasitic animal of the phylum Nematoda. All roundworms belong to the phylum, including Ancylostoma duodenale, Ascaris lumbricoides, Enterobius vermicularis, Necator americanus, Strongyloides stercoralis, and several other species.

nematode

Roundworm, see there.

nem·a·tode

(nem'ă-tōd)
A common name for any roundworm of the phylum Nematoda.

nematode

any member of the phylum Nematoda, containing roundworms such as ASCARIS.

Nematode

A type of roundworm with a long, unsegmented body, usually parasitic on animals or plants.

nem·a·tode

(nem'ă-tōd)
A common name for any roundworm of the phylum Nematoda.

nematode

a roundworm; any individual organism of the class Nematoda. Parasitism with any of the worms in this group represents a significant proportion of the diseases of animals. Includes: Ancylostoma, Ascaris, Capillaris, Dictyocaulus, Dioctophyma, Dirofilaria, Habronema, Haemonchus, Metastrongylus, Muellerius, Onchocerca, Ostertagia, Oxyuris, Parafilaria, Parascaris, Protostrongylus, Rhabditis, Skrjabinema, Spirocerca, Strongyloides, Strongylus, Syngamus, Thelazia, Trichuris, Toxocara, Trichinella, Trichostrongylus.

nematode galls
hard, fibrous excrescences produced in the seedheads of grasses by chronic inflammation created by an invasion by larvae of grass seed nematodes, e.g. Anguina spp.
grass-seed nematode
the grass seed nematode Anguina lolii infests Wimmera ryegrass and causes a fatal poisoning in animals eating the grass. Called also A. fenesta, A. agrostis. See also loliumrigidum.
References in periodicals archive ?
Ferris H, Bongers T, De Goede RGM (2001) A framework for soil food web diagnostics: extension of the nematode faunal analysis concept.
On hot summer days nematode infected succulent plants tend to wilt more rapidly than healthy plants but usually recover when the temperatures become cooler.
lupi nematode infection in dogs from Minnesota, New Mexico, Colorado, and Florida.
Researcher Dr Hannah Gruffudd said: "We have integrated climate modelling with a sophisticated model of tree growth to simulate the likelihood of trees dying from infestation by Pine Wood Nematode.
Although many investigations have reported the effect of biochars on fungal and bacterial populations in soil, there had been no research on the interaction of biochars with nematodes until a recent microcosm study showing that wheat-straw biochar increased the abundance of soil fungal-feeders and decreased the plant-parasitic nematode populations (Zhang et al.
The finding that the nematode responds not only to electrical fields but also to magnetic fields was published in the International Journal for Parasitology in August 2013.
Root-knot nematodes cause crop losses around the world, and they can be difficult to control.
Oral administration of the hydrophobic antioxidants tocotrienol, astaxanthin, or [gamma]-tocopherol, prolonged the nematode lifespan; tocotrienol rendered them resistant to infection with the opportunistic pathogen Legionella pneumophila.