nematocide

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nematocide

 [nem´ah-to-sīd″]
1. destroying nematodes.
2. an agent that destroys nematodes.

ne·mat·i·cide

, nematocide (nĕ-mat'i-sīd),
An agent that kills nematodes.
[nematode + L. caedo, to kill]

nematocide

/nem·a·to·cide/ (nem´ah-to-sīd″)
1. destroying nematodes.
2. an agent that so acts.

nematocide

also

nematicide

(nĕm′ə-tĭ-sīd′, nə-măt′ĭ-)
n.
A substance or agent used to kill nematodes.

nem′a·to·cid′al, nem′a·ti·cid′al (-sīd′l) adj.

nematocide

1. destroying nematodes.
2. an agent that destroys nematodes, including phenothiazine, piperazine, benzimidazole, the imidazothiazoles, the tetrahydropyrimidines, organophosphorus compounds and a wide variety of miscellaneous compounds, including the avermectins.
References in periodicals archive ?
Biological control of nematodes using rhizosphere micro-organisms was considered in several reviews to be a potential management tactic and an effective alternative to nematicides (Kerry, 2000; Mukhtar et al.
Cis and trans-protopinium a novel nematicide for the eco-friendly management of root knot nematodes.
Nematicides are used to eliminate plant-parasitic nematodes and are majorly delivered in two forms, namely, contact nematicides and fumigants.
Enhanced biodegradation of nematicides after repetitive applications and its effect on root and yield parameters in commercial banana plantations.
VBC's investment in Research and Development program has led to a rich pipeline of products which include bioinsecticides and a nematicide.
Conventional banana farms use protective plastic bags that have been impregnated with insecticides (typically chlorpyrifos), apply nematicides and fungicides via cropduster or by injection into the soil, and use herbicides to kill competing plants.
As much as 250 types of chemicals are used in agriculture, specifically 100 types of insecticide, 50 types of weed killer, 50 types of fungicide, 20 kinds nematicides and 30 kinds of other chemical substance (Edwards 1973).
Using this tall fescue as a preplant cover crop treatment may allow growers to reduce the use of chemical nematicides.
Tactics for management of plant-parasitic nematodes continue to rely on nematicides for suppression of population densities.
There is a general trend to control this disease by using chemical nematicides such as Nemcur and Furadan and biological control techniques were also found to be promising methods against root-knot nematodes.