nekton

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Related to nektonic: planktonic, Infaunal, Epifaunal

nekton

(nĕk′tən, -tŏn′)
n.
The collection of marine and freshwater organisms that can swim freely and are generally independent of currents, ranging in size from microscopic organisms to whales.

nek·ton′ic (-tŏn′ĭk) adj.

nekton

the population of free-swimming animals that inhabits the PELAGIC zone of oceans. Compare PLANKTON.
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References in periodicals archive ?
By studying the chondrichthyan fauna, the nektonic community can be added to the overall picture.
This patchiness, in turn, concentrates fish and nektonic invertebrates, which attract resident and migratory higher vertebrates.
Fish and nektonic crustacean abundance (numbers and biomass) and species composition differed along the salinity gradient between 0.
2] flux from the sediment to the water column), planktonic and nektonic respiration (autotrophs and heterotrophs), and photochemical degradation, will be further explored as separate topics.
Planktonic, benthic, and nektonic communities differ considerably along the salinity gradient of the Mullica River, as well as in areas of Great Bay where salinity differences can be substantial (Durand and Nadeau, 1972; Durand, 1988).
Their larvae are nektonic and are found associated with floating vegetation.
The associated biota can be subdivided into four units: epiphytic, epibenthic, infaunal and nektonic organisms (Kikuchi and Peres 1977).
I sampled nektonic invertebrate communities along benthic substrates by placing invertebrate activity traps (two traps/mesocosm) on the bottom-center of each mesocosm for 24 h (1-L plastic bottles with an inverted funnel opening on one end [Riley and Bookhout 1990]).
The effects of oyster shell dredging on macrobenthic and nektonic organisms in San Antonio Bay.
Seasonal distribution, abundance, biomass, species richness, and community composition of nektonic, demersal, epibenthic, and infaunal organisms were examined in cultivated and uncultivated shallow-water habitats in Virginia and New Jersey.
The Fornea Formation is represented by a 22 m thick succession of grey marly limestones and marls, containing an abundant and diversified fossil content of nektonic groups (ammonites, belemnites).