nekton


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nekton

(nĕk′tən, -tŏn′)
n.
The collection of marine and freshwater organisms that can swim freely and are generally independent of currents, ranging in size from microscopic organisms to whales.

nek·ton′ic (-tŏn′ĭk) adj.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

nekton

the population of free-swimming animals that inhabits the PELAGIC zone of oceans. Compare PLANKTON.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005
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References in periodicals archive ?
This is the first of half a dozen regions the Nekton Mission plans to explore before the end of 2022.
Anomalous pelagic nekton abundance, distribution, and apparent recruitment in the Northern California Current in 2004 and 2005.
Thiede, "Skeletal plankton and nekton in upwelling water masses off northwestern south America and northwest Africa," in Coastal Upwelling: Its Sediment Record, E.
[dagger] Dodson and Cooper (1983) also report clearance rates up to 2.7 1 (1 [predator.sup.-1] [h.sup.-1]) for large nekton killed but not ingested.
Buesseler's plans called for collecting water samples at 30 locations, from the surface to 6,000 feet deep; to conduct net tows for phytoplankton, zooplankton, and nekton (free-swimming organisms) in various combinations at every station; and to sample the air and surface water continuously for radioactivity.
Nekton Trophy during the Academy's annual awards assembly held last month.
Since 1982, nekton have been sampled in each Texas bay system using bag seines and trawls.
The importance of plankton and nekton distributions in Ordovician palaeogeographical reconstructions.
Limited bioturbation and a predominance of pelagic nekton over benthic organisms suggest a low-oxygen environment prevailed during much of the middle Miocene.