negligence


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Related to negligence: Medical negligence

negligence

 [neg´lĭ-jens]
in law, the failure to do something that a reasonable person of ordinary prudence would do in a certain situation or the doing of something that such a person would not do. Negligence may provide the basis for a lawsuit when there is a legal duty, as the duty of a physician or nurse to provide reasonable care to patients and when the negligence results in damage to the patient.

negligence

Medical malpractice The failure or alleged failure on the part of a physician or other health care provider to exercise ordinary, reasonable, usual, or expected care, prudence, or skill–that would usually and customarily be exercised by other reputable physicians treating similar Pts–in performing a legally recognized duty, resulting in forseeable harm, injury or loss to another; negligence may be an act of omission–ie, unintentional, or commission–ie, intentional, characterized by inattention, recklessness, inadvertence, thoughtlessness, or wantonness. See Adverse event, Comparative negligence, Contributory negligence, Gross negligence, Malpractice, Wanton negligence, Willful negligence. Cf Recklessness.
Negligence, required elements  
Duty A recognized relationship between Pt and physician
Breach Failure of a medical practitioner to practice in accordance with standard of care
Proximate cause The plaintiff must show that injury is reasonably connected to physician's action
Damages Plaintiff must show that alleged loss or damage has a quantifiable value such that a monetary payment can be made APLM 1997; 121:252

neg·li·gence

(neg'li-jĕns)
Failure to perform duties or activities with due diligence and attention or to meet the standards of regular care.

neg·li·gence

(neg'li-jĕns)
Failure to perform duties or activities with due diligence and attention or to meet the standards of regular care.
References in periodicals archive ?
The early common law held joint tortfeasors jointly and severally liable for any indivisible injury their joint negligence caused a plaintiff to suffer.
For example, if a resident was given the wrong medication and suffered an adverse effect, then all four elements of the tort of negligence exist.
This article is extracted from my thesis under the title of "The relationship between negligence and academic performance Second grade and third grade students in city Jahrom".
Fifth and finally, once this comment lays bare the conceptual and practical difficulties of the slight-gross rule, this comment will offer several alternatives to South Dakota's current formulation and recommend the South Dakota Legislature adopt a new comparative negligence statute (24) After recommending a change, this article will discuss and overcome the greatest hurdle to adopting a new rule: the myth of increased insurance rates and the other expenses.
The case centered on defendant Christopher Medina's refusal to admit negligence during the discovery process, which requires good-faith answers.
He said that her daughter was still in critical condition and strict action should be taken against doctors for their negligence in handling the patient.
Among the 46 states that have abandoned contributory negligence, there are several variations of comparative negligence that have replaced the traditional rule and related doctrines such as joint and several liability.
Higgs & Sons is 'an excellent firm for clinical negligence' with 'a strong and dedicated staff team'.
The defense argued there was no evidence of gross negligence and at most the evidence showed only ordinary negligence that could not survive summary disposition.
A team of two youths from Child Avengers have embarked on a campaign to sensitise the community about child negligence, which seems to be rife in the Ngamiland District.
For this column on nursing liability topics, the issue of medication errors will be a focal point when comparing negligence in nursing practice versus gross negligence.