neglect

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neglect

 [nĕ-glekt´]
disregard of or failure to perform some task or function.
unilateral neglect
1. hemiapraxia with failure to pay attention to bodily grooming and stimuli on one side but not on the other, usually due to a lesion in the central nervous system, as after a stroke. Called also selective inattention.
2. a nursing diagnosis accepted by the North American Nursing Diagnosis Association, defined as a state in which there is a lack of awareness and attention to one side of the body.

ne·glect

(nĕ-glĕkt'),
1. To disregard or ignore; to fail to perform a duty or to give due attention or care.
2. Lack of proper attention or care.
[L. neglego, to leave out of account, fr. nec, not, + lego, to choose]

neglect

Neurology Neglect syndrome The inability to perform a particular motor activity, often residual to a CVA. See Neglect patient Patient care The conscious ignoring–by a physician or other provider–of a clinical finding that might, in another setting and/or in another Pt, trigger further evaluation or therapy. See Benign neglect. Cf Negligence Psychology '…the failure of a caretaker to provide basic shelter, supervision, medical care, or support.', neglect of children or elders, a form of maltreatment, which may be linked to poverty. See Child abuse, Elder abuse, Elder neglect, Self-neglect, Willful patient neglect.

ne·glect

(nĕg-lekt)
1. Failure of a health care provider or caregiver to observe due care and diligence in performing services or delivering medicine or other products so as to avoid harming a patient.
2. Generally, indifference or inadequate attention to one's responsibilities in regard to self-care, care of others, or other aspects of one's personal or professional life.
3. occupational therapy The tendency to behave as if one side of the body or one side of space did not exist, with impairment of skilled or purposeful movements and visual scanning and awareness. Types of neglect include spatial, visual, and body schema (i.e., personal).
See also: hemiapraxia
[L. neglego, to leave out of account, fr. nec, not, + lego, to choose]

ne·glect

(nĕg-lekt)
To fail to perform a duty or give proper care.
References in periodicals archive ?
THE number of cases of child cruelty and neglect reported to police have tripled in the past five years, it has emerged.
Figures obtained by the NSPCC show there were 1,969 children on the Child Protection Register in Northern Ireland, with neglect remaining one of the biggest reasons for being cited.
The charity is calling for "increased support for children who have suffered cruelty and neglect, to ensure they receive vital support services when they need them most".
Ms Rochira said: "There have been a number of truly horrifying cases of abuse and neglect in Wales where, despite extensive investigations and evidence of significant concern, there has been a total failure to bring criminal charges.
However, I was disappointed he neglected to discuss the alternative for Israel after its soldiers were seized by Hezbollah on Israeli land.
This may explain errors in fact and interpretation: the author entirely neglects the abolitionist movement of 1878-88 and misunderstands the nature of earlier abolitionism; she suggests most Afro-Brazilians were slaves in 1888; she errs in the character and chronology of successful immigrant wage labor and of paulista industrialization; she often divides the Brazilian population between Afro-Brailian freedmen and white elites; she neglects the apposite historiography of Rio; she misunderstands the origins of Gilberto Freyre's seminal work, the Revolution of 1930, and the stillborn revolutionary attempt of 1935; she calls Machado de Assis one of Brazil's greatest poets; she neglects the seminal racism of Oliveira Viana, etc..
So, to return to the Times' and AP's most recent revision of Honduras in the early eighties, one must read passages like this with some suspicion: "The rights commission's report blamed Honduran counterintelligence units trained by Americans and Argentines and backed by the contras for the torture and killings of leftists in the 1980s, when much of Central America was engulfed in civil wars." While the wire story mentions Alvarez and Battalion 3-16, claiming that the commission's report "blamed much of the wrongdoing on Intelligence Batallion 3-16" (sic), it neglects to mention that Honduras' woes were manufactured in, and fully funded by, our own government working in cahoots with yet another wanna-be dictator.
The AP writer called him a "passionate anti-communist" but neglected to point out that Alvarez had spent years hobnobbing with the fascists and ultraright terrorists who made up the membership rosters of the World Anti-Communist League and its affiliated organization, the Latin American Anti-Communist Confederation (CAL).