negativism


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Related to negativism: negativistic personality disorder

negativism

 [neg´ah-tĭ-vizm″]
opposition to suggestion or advice; an attitude or behavior opposite to that appropriate to a specific situation. A tendency to do the opposite of what most people would do under similar circumstances, of what one is told to do, or of what physiologic needs would suggest; e.g., it is not uncommon in catatonic schizophrenia for the patient to feel compelled to lower his arms if asked to raise them or to clench his fists if asked to open his hands.

neg·a·tiv·ism

(neg'ă-tiv-izm),
A tendency to do the opposite of what one is requested to do, or to resist stubbornly for no apparent reason; seen in catatonic states and in toddlers.

negativism

/neg·a·tiv·ism/ (neg´ah-tĭ-vizm″) opposition to suggestion or advice; behavior opposite to that appropriate to a specific situation or against the wishes of others, including direct resistance to efforts to be moved.

negativism

(nĕg′ə-tĭ-vĭz′əm)
n.
1. The practice or habit of being skeptical, critical, or pessimistic, especially toward the views or suggestions of others.
2. Behavior characterized by persistent refusal, without apparent or logical reasons, to act on or carry out suggestions, orders, or instructions of others.

neg′a·tiv·ist n.
neg′a·tiv·is′tic adj.

negativism

[neg′ətiviz′əm]
Etymology: L, negare, to deny
a behavioral attitude characterized by opposition, resistance, the refusal to cooperate with even the most reasonable request, and the tendency to act in a contrary manner. The resulting response may be passive, such as the immobile, rigid postures observed in catatonic schizophrenia, or active, such as in a belligerent, impulsive, or capricious act like lowering the arms when asked to raise them or sitting down when asked to stand.

negativism

Psychiatry
Covert or overt opposition or resistance to external influence, suggestions or advice/
 
Vox populi
Any expression of rebellion or disagreement with a perceived status quo.

neg·a·tiv·ism

(neg'ă-tiv-izm)
1. A tendency to do the opposite of what one is requested to do, or to stubbornly resist for no apparent reason; seen in catatonic states and in toddlers.
2. Pessimism.

Negativism

Behavior characterized by resistance, opposition, and refusal to cooperate with requests, even the most reasonable ones.
Mentioned in: Catatonia
References in periodicals archive ?
In the athletic context, Martens (1977) developed specific questionnaires for evaluations of the negativism state and trace, the Competitive State Anxiety Inventory-1 (CSAI-1) and the Sport Competition Anxiety Test (SCAT), and demonstrated that, in this context, these inventories evaluated the negativism better than more general measures (such as Trait Anxiety Inventory and State Anxiety Inventory).
If that negativism turns voters off -- and the ''ugliness of politics'' is one of the most frequent explanations for people choosing not to vote -- then it merely shrinks the potential pool of Kerry supporters.
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Grounded in home-grown ideas and a realization that change is necessary to generate jobs, there is growing support in the Middle East for the catalytic role of economic opportunity, a light that shines brightly, dispelling negativism and despair.
Are CEOs intimidated by the cacophony of negativism from pundits with a Club of Rome mentality agonizing over what may happen in the corporate world?
Dealing with negativism by cleverly creating choices and persistently enforcing discipline when necessary is not easy.
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By working to develop alternating current against the negativism of the entire scientific world, Tesla truly lit up the world.
He called this lack of confidence "irrational negativism.
Despite the negativism associated with children who learn differently from their same-aged counterparts, practitioners have documented that many officially-classified LD, EH, and SPED students significantly improved their achievement after they were taught with approaches and resources that complemented their learning styles (Andrews, 1990; Bauer, 1987; Brunner & Majewski, 1990, Klavas, 1992; Perrin, 1990; Quinn, 1994; Stone, 1992).