negative patient outcome

negative patient outcome

(1) Any adverse response to a therapeutic intervention.
(2) A hospital management and/or malpractice carrier euphemism for "the patient died", which may be used to indicate the possibility that the adverse outcome was related to an iatrogenic error.
References in periodicals archive ?
If nurses are traumatised at work, the likelihood of mistakes occurring may increase and result in poor patient care or a negative patient outcome.
Research has shown that variation in processes of care is problematic because it can lead to increased rates of error and potential negative patient outcomes.
Prescribe 5 days of antibiotic treatment for inpatients with community-acquired pneumonia because it produces the same clinical success rates as longer treatment regimens, but is associated with fewer negative patient outcomes.
A problematic bleeding situation--involving bleeding that is more than routine and resistant to conventional means of control--is one of the most threatening complications of surgery and a frequent cause of negative patient outcomes, posing significant clinical and economic challenges.
Earlier this month, the multiple fought back against claims of negative patient outcomes from a type of replacement lens it uses (http://bit.
Negative patient outcomes have an impact on all nurses in different ways.
More recently, Duffield and associates (2010) found fewer RNs, increased workload, and unstable nursing unit environments were linked to negative patient outcomes including falls and medication errors on medical-surgical units.
When RN staffing in decreased there is an increase in negative patient outcomes, including hospital acquired infections and fatal complications.
When nursing patient hours at the bedside decrease, negative patient outcomes increase.
A recent Department of Health & Human Services study showed strong and consistent relationships between both levels and mix of RN staffing and negative patient outcomes such as UTIs, upper GI bleeding, pneumonia, LOS, shock, and failure to rescue.
Maintaining the status quo is not a feasible option; we are paying far too high a price in the emotional burnout and decayed morale of nurses, starting rates of overtime, illness and absenteeism, and most important, potentially negative patient outcomes.
The survey team, consisting of three nurses and myself, spent two weeks at each hospital in our region, trying to discover all the negative patient outcomes, flawed policies, and inadequate quanlity assurance programs that we could.