negative inotrope

negative inotropic agent

Any agent, including beta-blockers (e.g., metoprolol) or calcium channel blockers (e.g., diltiazem, verapamil), used to manage congestive heart failure caused by pure diastolic dysfunction, as such agents reduce cardiac contractility.

negative inotrope

Negative inotropic agent Cardiology Any agent–eg, β—blockers–eg, metoprolol or CCBs–eg, diltiazem, verapamil, used to manage CHF due to pure diastolic dysfunction, as they ↓ cardiac contractility
References in periodicals archive ?
Chloroquine exerts its toxicity by quinidine-like mechanisms: It is a profound negative inotrope and a vasodilator.
Disopyramide as a negative inotrope in obstructive cardiomyopathy in children.
Successful medical treatment of obstruction with negative inotropes slows acceleration of left ventricular ejection with delay in SAM, ultimately yielding a lower pressure gradient.
Medical treatment must be adjusted in these patients from negative inotropes to ACE inhibitors, digoxin, diuretics and ?
TNF acts as a potent negative inotrope and stimulator of fibrotic changes in the heart.
TNF is a potent negative inotrope which increases as heart failure worsens.
Endothelin also-acts as a negative inotrope, at least in some animal models.
Negative inotropes reduce calcium in the cell and thus reduce contractility (and stabilise heart rate at the same time).
Beta-blockers: It was once believed that beta-blocker drugs, being negative inotropes, should not be used to treat HF but numerous large clinical trials have shown this class of drug increases survival, reduces hospitalisation and improves heart function in systolic HF.
8) Regardless of the agents used for the induction of anesthesia, care must be taken at all times to minimize the effects of negative inotropes, maintain heart rate and intravascular volume and avoid reductions in systemic vascular resistance (SVR).