eugenics

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Related to negative eugenics: positive eugenics

eugenics

 [u-jen´iks]
the study and control of procreation as a means of improving hereditary characteristics of future generations. The concept has sometimes been used in a pseudoscientific way as an excuse for unethical, racist, or even genocidal practices such as involuntary sterilization or certain other practices in Nazi Germany and elsewhere.
macro eugenics eugenics policies that affect whole populations or groups. This has sometimes led to racism and genocide, such as the Nazi policies of sterilization and extermination of ethnic groups.
micro eugenics eugenics policies affecting only families or kinship groups; such policies are directed mainly at women and thus raise special ethical issues.
negative eugenics that concerned with prevention of reproduction by individuals considered to have inferior or undesirable traits.
positive eugenics that concerned with promotion of optimal mating and reproduction by individuals considered to have desirable or superior traits.

eu·gen·ics

(yū-jen'iks),
1. Practices and policies, as of mate selection or of sterilization, which tend to better the innate qualities of progeny and human stock.
2. Practices and genetic counseling directed to anticipating genetic disability and disease.
Synonym(s): orthogenics
[G. eugeneia, nobility of birth, fr. eu, well, + genesis, production]

eugenics

(yo͞o-jĕn′ĭks)
n. (used with a sing. verb)
The study or practice of attempting to improve the human gene pool by encouraging the reproduction of people considered to have desirable traits and discouraging or preventing the reproduction of people considered to have undesirable traits.

eu·gen′ic adj.
eu·gen′i·cal·ly adv.

eu·gen·ics

(yū-jen'iks)
1. Practices and policies, as in mate selection or sterilization, which tend to better the innate qualities of progeny and human stock.
2. Practices and genetic counseling directed to anticipating genetic disability and disease.
[G. eugeneia, nobility of birth, fr. eu, well, + genesis, production]

eugenics

The study or practice of trying to improve the human race by encouraging the breeding of those with desired characteristics (positive eugenics) or by discouraging the breeding of those whose characteristics are deemed undesirable (negative eugenics). The concept implies that there exists some person or institution capable of making such decisions. It also implies possible grave interference with human rights. For these reasons, the principles, which have long been successfully applied to domestic animals, have never been adopted for humans except by despots such as Adolf Hitler.

eugenics

the study of ways of improving the hereditary qualities of a population (especially the human population) by the application of social controls, guided by genetical principles.

Eugenics

A social movement in which the population of a society, country, or the world is to be improved by controlling the passing on of hereditary information through mating.
Mentioned in: Gene Therapy
References in periodicals archive ?
Keynes often deployed guarded language when discussing specific policies, opting instead for vague references to the population's "quality." This wording nonetheless conveyed explicitly negative eugenic objectives, perhaps most evident in a June 1926 appearance at the University of Berlin.
Widespread negative eugenics occurred in the twentieth century, under the direction of Marie Stopes (Britain), Margaret Sanger (America) and Adolf Hitler (Germany).
Nigel's positive eugenics that aim to develop a healthy race are treated sympathetically, perhaps because the island setting removes the colony from the framework of mainland nationalist endeavours, whereas the negative eugenics of Linda's uncle are destructive and symbolically aligned with sexual abuse.
In the original legislation, individuals were to be sterilized if it could be shown that "the patient might safely be discharged if the danger of the procreation with its attendant risk of multiplication of evil by transmission of the disability to progeny were eliminated." Rife with hereditary disease references that would instill fear in the province's citizenry and mental health practitioners this official reason for sterilization is indicative of the eugenic movement's emphasis on negative eugenics.
He supported negative eugenics but recognized a more cautious approach to positive eugenics as means for social development.
When eugenics is mentioned, everyone immediately thinks of negative eugenics in the Third Reich.
These theorists sought a state-controlled program to improve the quality of the human gene pool by optimizing the breeding of elite white Anglo-Saxon Protestants (positive eugenics), and controlling the reproduction of "degenerates," "morons," and those of "inferior" racial or ethnic groupings (negative eugenics).
"Since the makeup of the packet will determine whether or not they reproduce...some right to choose characteristics, either by negative exclusion or positive selection, should follow as well." Already, selective abortion is widely accepted after prenatal genetic screening uncovers an "anomaly." Although some (notably disability rights activists) critique such "negative eugenics," many people accept this practice for serious medical conditions.
Policies within the eugenics movements in the early decades of the 20th century included positive eugenics, which sought to foster more breeding among those deemed to be socially meritorious; and negative eugenics, which sought to discourage breeding among those deemed to be socially disadvantageous....
Negative eugenics proposed that individuals who were below average should have fewer or no children.
Similarly, those who elect not to have children with certain disabilities may be implementing a form of negative eugenics.
In the 1930s, Hitler's Nazis, inspired by Galton, adopted positive and negative eugenics with their notion of The Aryan Master Race.